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Shay,
I have converted Kimbers to 9x23, 10mm, .460 Rowland, .45Super, .40 Super, and .400 Corbon.

All of these conversions are very easy, the 10mm is very quick and you can use a "drop in barrel" and heavier springs.

On some of the other conversions I have also replaced the ejectors to improve reliability on some but mostly to stop the brass from being kicked into my nose on each shot....

The Rowland requires fitting a comp and tapering/profiling it to the slide for a nice looking conversion. On the .45 Super guns I changed the firing pin and stop to an over size set of EB "hard core parts".
 
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Shay,
The only barrels I own are from Barsto.
(except the .460 Rowland wich came from Clark)
I usually buy the "gunsmith" fit models for my 1911s and the prefit "drop in" for my Glocks.

One thing to note is that Barsto does offer an awful lot of barrel/length/calibers that are not listed on their website.



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: David DiFabio on 2001-07-06 15:54 ]</font>
 

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Shay, if you are interested, I have a non-transferable certificate for a Bar-Sto SS barrel assembly. I am willing to order the barrel of your choice with this certificate for a nominal price. Check in the for sale forum.
 

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Re: Converting Kimber 40 to 10mm

NCBEN said:
I have a Kimber Gold Match in 40 SW and interested in what adavantage it would be to have it converted to 10mm?
Power. Instead of pushing a 180gr bullet to under 1,000 ft/sec, you can push it to about 1320 ft/sec or so with factory ammo. That's just barely shy of 700 ft-lbs. 8)

If you don't need more power, than it won't do anything for you, except maybe feed a bit more reliably (in theory) and give you a small accuracy edge.
 

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10mm conversion

Sean thanks for input.
How well does the 1911 hold up to the additional stress of the 10mm?
I keep hearing how abusive the 10mm is especially on stainless pistols fact or over stated?
Does the 10mm have much advantage over 45 acp for personal defense?
Who would you recommend modifing (want to shoot both 40 & 10)?

Thanks
Ben
 

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In general, they hold up fine if you have a sensible recoil setup... say 18-20lb Wolff variable spring and a buffer on a steel guide rod. There is no free ride, but the wearing and tearing that 10mm guns supposedly suffer is hugely overstated in my experience. If you shoot lots of jacketed ammo at maximum speed you could eventually wear the barrel out. My main concern would be the extractor, I understand that higher pressure cartridges in general are tougher on them & I know that both myself and a friend of mine had 10mm 1911's break chucks off their stock extractors. Might never be an issue, but if you are paranoid I'd throw an AFTEC extractor into the mix.

For personal defense? I can't prove it to you, but I'm a firm believer that more is better as long as you can hit with it at a speed that is acceptable to you. At some point you have to decide where the tradeoff between rate of fire and power kicks in for you and choose accordingly. If .40 S&W recoil feels like a total joke then 10mm is a logical step up. If it is borderline-disturbing then a better choice might be .45 ACP, which to me is a creampuff to shoot in a 5" 1911.

Personally, I don't go for the absolute maximum in 10mm power for self-defense ammo. A Pro Load 180gr Gold Dot at "only" 1200 ft/sec gives you the sectional density of a 230gr .45 ACP heavyweight, and the muzzle energy of a 165gr .45 ACP +P lightweight, which to me is a fine combination. The nice thing about 10mm is that if you want really heavy AND fast loads for hunting or back-up against moderately sized mean critters, the potential is there whenever you want it.
 
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