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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a Kimber that has a slide stop that won't drop free on a loaded mag, during a slide rack on reload. :mad: Have cleaned and lubed the pistol, including plunger tube. Any help would be appreciated!
 

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Usually when the stop won't disengage during a slide rack, it's one of two things:
1. You're simply not pulling the slide FULLY to the rear.
This is easy to do with a very strong recoil spring and/or in a very small gun.
People will insist this isn't the case until they check it themselves by operating the slide SLOWLY and pulling it ALL the way back.
To test, just lock the slide open on an EMPTY gun, then, watching the stop closely pull the slide to the rear and see if the angled cut on the slide pushes the stop down.

2. The gun is fitted with some sort of recoil buffer system that is preventing the slide from moving far enough to the rear.
Again, this may only show up when you attempt to rack the slide.
Recoil buffers take up some room and do limit the amount of slide movement, often just enough to prevent or restrict the slide movement enough to cause these feed or slide stop problems.

Another less likely possibility is the slide stop notch in the slide is mis-cut and isn't pushing the stop down when the slide is pulled to the rear, or the slide stop is damaged or improperly made.

Remember, the slide stop is pushed down by the angled front of the cut in the slide and if the slide isn't pulled far enough to the rear for any reason, the stop won't be pushed down enough to release it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the pointers. It was a shok-buff that I had put in a few months ago and this was the first trip to the range since.
 

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Shock Buff.

1. An ingenious solution to a non-existent problem.

2. The answer to a question that nobody asked.

Here we have the modern-day version of the 19th century snake oil salesman.

Marketing 101:

First, convince the customer that he needs it...and then sell it to him.
 

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These polymer buffers do have a place ,if desired ,on range guns to help prevent battering in high round count guns.

They have NO place on a defense gun. The buffers do wear out and start to shred. This can easily cause stoppages and a jammed gun.

If you want to use a buffer on a range gun, have at it, but John M. Browning didn't think one was needed or he would have designed one in.
 
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