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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about to order my very first semi-custom 1911. I'm pretty much decided on a Wilson CQB. However, part of me wants adjustable sights for a gun that accurate (1" @ 25 - Guarantee)

I'm not a bullseye shooter. This is my home defense and action pistol shooting partner. So fixed combat sights are the way to go - I think. But, I'm looking at the Les Baer super-tac with adjustable sights. But I don't want adjustable sights - yes I do want them - no I don't.

I guess if someone can tell me that an average CQB with a 6 oclock hold on a 6" bullseye at 25 yards is likely to not need elevation adjustment, I'll be happy.

(I'll be even happier when this is all settled <grin>.)
 

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I used to be a diehard adjustable sight gun guy too, home defense , carry , it didnt matter. That was till I got my Les Baer Stinger. It has fixed sights and they are spot on. I will never go back to adjustable sights for my defense guns. I dont fiddle with them, I just shoot the gun and know where the bullet goes now. I can even adjust my hold for distance to a pretty good degree if i even bother (usually not).

Once you shoot a defensive gun with fixed sights that are "on" you might not go back either. Im not entirely sure what it is, but you get some sort of confidence boost in the gun (at least I did). Makes absolutely no sence, but thats what happened to me.

_________________
if it flies it dies, if it runs it's done

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Peter Zahn on 2001-11-01 22:30 ]</font>
 

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I had a stock CQB that shot dead center at 25 yards holding a 6 oclock POA.
if you get a CQB you can always change the rear Wilson Pyramid sight to an adjustable MMC.
if you get a Les Baer with rear Bomar you can change it to Heinie's new fixed replacement for that.

win win situation, dont loose any sleep over it :smile:

regards,
shay
 

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You've just answered your own question. Adjustable sights are great for bullseye target shooters. They need them when/where varying light conditions over the course of a match necesitates sight corrections. They learn the number of clicks they may need by keeping careful, DETAILED records of their practice and match sessions (wind & light direction, temperature conditions, etc.). guessing wrong won't cost them their lives.

Adjustable sights became "de riguer" bsck in the days before high-visibility fixed sights became available. Back then, the only way to get a better sight picture was by using the relaitvely fragile adjustable target sights. THe gunsmithing trade found ways to make them less obtrusive by milling the slide to accept the Bomar, Micro, and S&W K-frame sights of the era. It was a trade-off, more useable sights in exchange for a somewhat more fragile defensive arm. Nowadays, there are really great fixed sights that offer the same or better sight picture that will not abrade your clothes or skin.

How many different loadings are you planning to shoot/carry? Most serious end-users carry 230-gr something factory load, and practice with a 200-gr. H&G #68 LSWC reload that shoots to the same POA. Your defensive arm should shoot to POA at 25-35 meters/yds with the duty load. Adjusting good fixed sights is not a big deal. Find which load with the desired power factor that groups the best and dial in your sights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, what a bunch of great folks on this site.

To answer your question, Andy. I'll probably settle in on a factory load for defense. For action shooting: 200gr LSWC I got from Bear Creek (they have some kinda coating that doesn't lead up too bad).

Hadn't tought of adjusting the hand loads to match the POA as a factory. Good idea. I'll just have to keep playing with factory brands and hand loadings. Gee something to do at the range, hehe.

Thanks,

Steve
 

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I have a Kimber Target. The sight hasn't self destructed. I love it. If you want to play with a BUNCH of different ammo and bullet weights you can't beat adjustable sights that are EASY in the adjustable department. I've seen MMC and their adjustables and while the sight picture is cool it isn't as simple as a BOMAR or Kimber clone to set up. Decide on what the pistol may do in your life.
 

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I have found uses for both adjustable and fixed in my life..

When I am playing with loads, especially when I have a wide range of bullet weight and velocities, I'll go with adjustable sights...

That's pretty much why on my 38 super, 9x23 and 40S&W guns I have used adjustable sights..On 45 and 9mm guns, I'll go with fixed sights..because I pretty much have my loads chosen for those guns..so there ya go..I don't think you can go wrong with whatever you choose..but the fixed (heinies or novaks are a lot less to deal with..
 

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The 6 o'clock hold went out with high button shoes. Use what the Marines call a "half-mast bull" or center hold. Modern fixed sights are usually designed to impact dead center with a center hold, using the most often used bullet weight in that caliber. A .45 will impact dead on with 200-235 grain bullets.
A rule of thumb is: If you intend to use lighter or heavier bullets than the usually prescribed pill, you need to either get adjustable sights or adjust your front sight for the exact point of impact. Sometimes, this entails filing or replacing with a higher sight. Heavier bullets impact higher, lighter bullets impact lower. This is due to the effects of recoil, so it may not be apparent from a Ransom Rest. Hand hold your pistol when you sight in. Ransom rests are for testing ammo loads for group.
Another rule of thumb: A target pistol is AIMED; a defense pistol is POINTED. An IDPA pistol requires the capability of using either technique.
A defense pistol, that is going to be pointed, must be perfectly fitted to the shooter, in all respects. A target pistol can be made from a barrel and a piece of 2X4 and turn in X ring groups. (Sighting vs muscle memory.)
 

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John's AIMED versus POINTED distinction is a very good one. If you already know that precision shooting is not in the cards, the CQB should more than meet your needs.

Personally, I opted for a Wilson Classic, and I've found their adjustable sight to be unobtrusive and well-constructed -- no troubles whatsoever. It's proven to be a lot less fragile and snag-prone than one might think. Of course, logic dictates that if the same kind of functional accuracy could be obtained using a set of fixed Straight Eights, then the latter would probably be the way to go.

As Shay put it, it's a Win-Win situation.

Chuck
 
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