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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm (finally) switching to nothing but CLP for my AR15's. Good cleaning properties and you don't have to worry about clearing away harsh cleaning products. It also leaves a coating of teflon behind -- the longer it's used the thicker the layer of teflon. At least that's the theory. And those in the know over on AR15.com swear by nothing else.
Does the same theory hold true on 1911's? Why is it that more people don't use strickly CLP for the Cleaning, Lubricating and Protecting of their 1911's? Is it that CLP, while good, is surpassed by some of the other choices out there (such as Wilson Ultima Lube)?

I would LOVE to get rid of the Hoppes #9 (or at least only use it occassionally) and just boresnake and scrub with CLP. I could finally go back to taking more than one or two guns to the range and not have to spend all night cleaning them.

TIA
 

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Jac

Depending on who made your 1911 I would recommend avoiding any teflon based lubricant on the slide and frame of your pistol. The reason for this is a certain amount of friction between the slide and frame is necessary for proper operation of he pistol, and these lubricants can be too good. So unless your pistol has a very tight slide to frame fit, battering can result. I am sure some of the other followers of the folder can give you additional advice. Probably better advice than mine. But I have battered one of my 1911s by using teflon based lubricants, where the slide to frame fit was not that snug.

I suggest that you mention which 1911 you have and if it has been customized, so we can give you a better evaluation of your question.

I hope this helps.
PaulB
 

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I have found that anything designed to perform more than one function does not efficiently perform all of those functions. I am no chemist, but I have a hard time with accepting one product that acts as both an effective solvent and a lubricant. I prefer G96 Crud Buster for cleaning, Hoppes Bench Rest 9 for copper removal, and Militec lubricants. Are there any more chemically inclined forum members that can either support or correct my perception?
 

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As I understand it CLP was designed for use by the military, they do not have the same neeed to have a completely copper/lead free bore that most of the most of the civilian population want.

If you are not using your AR15 for very serious competition (requiring 1MOA or less or extreamly long range) then CLP should serve you well.

I use CLP for every thing and about every 6 months use Shooters Choice on the bore since pin point accuracy is not necessary for me.

Pat
 

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On 2001-07-26 06:06, SNAPCUT wrote:
I am no chemist, but I have a hard time with accepting one product that acts as both an effective solvent and a lubricant.
I tend to agree - kinda sounds like there is a little power struggle going on in each
bottle of the stuff, huh? Don't you put solvents on first, to get rid of lubricants?
You would think there should be nothing but air left inside a new CLP bottle, once the ingredients get done battling it out! :grin:
 
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I soak all of my guns in CLP after shooting,hang dry them, assemble the grips and send them on their way...
In truly hostile environments no lubricant can really protect them from corrosion and keeping them clean becomes priority #1.
CLP is very cheap in bulk 1-5 gal. buckets and works as well as any product on the market.

At times on my new guns I will treat the bore with Tetra to smooth it and help to break them in.

For maximum accuracy it matters very little what you use it is the frequency of cleaning that counts.

You can use almost any type of solvent/lubricant, for best results clean between each round fired.

With a 1911 or really any firearm, use the lubricant sparingly as less is more.
 

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I have found one cleaner/lube does not do all well.

CLP is a good product. But when really crudded up a good bore cleaner like Hoppes is excellent.

I use Break Free bore cleaner not because it is the best only because I have not finished the bottle.

I am not that finicky or knowledgeable on the stuff.

I do know this and from experience(screw up) Be very cautious when using an ammonia based cleaner (Sweet's or one of the Hoppe cleaners I forget which one) on or near any kind of nickel finish. You can damage the finish.

I hope this helps.
 

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Terry and Jac

Hoppe's #9 (Yellow Lable) Powder solvent is the version you are thinking of that contains ammonia, and you are correct is will desolve a nickle finish if you let your pistol sit in it for a good length of time. If you put it on and wipe it off quickly you should be okay. Another thing to avoid with ammonia based solvents is using another product after it that contains chlorine, like Ezzoxx as one example. This combination will mix inside the small crevices inside the pistol and form ammonia chloride which is a very corrosive salt that is hydroscopic.

From the decription of CLP it sounds like REMOIL, which uses petroleum distilates (a solvent) and contains teflon. In this case the solvent is used as a carrier for the teflon, and as described above when the solvent evaporates the teflon is left behind. I do not think using the carrier solvent as a cleaning solvent is a very good idea, just a personal bias, as you are now mixing your lubricant with the grunge in your pistol. It would seem that some of the grunge will get left behind with the lubricant.

Using CLP in a Wilson is probably okay since I expect them to have a good slide to frame fit. In the "Wilson Combat 1911 Auto Maintenance Manual" Bill Wilson recommends using Tetra, as an option to his Ultima-Lube, and Tetra products do contain teflon. So there is a basis of recomendation for CLP. Though I would not recommend it on anything where the slide to frame fit is not fairly snug, like on some Colts. Since the teflon based lubriants can be too good, and battering can result.

I hope this helps.
PaulB
 

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On 2001-10-04 13:23, catmath 1911 wrote:
What exactly is battering, and would a wilson Shok-Buff prevent it?
Welcome to the forum!

Battering is the effect of the slide cycling and making contact with the frame (or guide rod specifically). A shok buff will LESSEN the battering, not prevent it. A fresh, proper weight recoil spring will help as well.

Do a search under "buff" or "shok buff" for more info. It is a very subjective topic. Some love 'em, some hate 'em. I say that if your gun runs reliably with them - use them. Not all guns function well with them however - especially the compact length guns.
 

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Thanks Shane.

One more question on this topic, What would be some visual evidence of a battering pistol? I have a 2000 model stainless Loaded Springfield 1911, and I bought some Break-Free to use on this gun. I am not sure now, whether to use it or not due to the battering issue.

Thanks,
catmath 1911
 

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Just shoot it. Check every 100,000 rounds for signs of battering (peened, bent, deformed metal where parts interact, i.e., slide and frame, junction where flange on quide rod contacts frame, etc.)

Seriously, in my experience you shoot 'em and wipe 'em and go to dinner.

It's possible to over-clean a gun. Not a good thing for the lands in the barrel. When I was shooting a bunch, I cleaned about every 2000 rounds. Most of what I shot was lead so I'd shoot some hardball through it occasionally to clean out some lead.

Put a drop of lube in strategic areas in between cleanings. Of course, you get to do it your way.

_________________
"Your aim in life is not worth anything if you don't pull the trigger."

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: tonerguy on 2001-10-04 19:10 ]</font>
 

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I have Wilson Shok-Buffs in all my Para's; my Springfield; and a genuine GI .45. All work fine with them.

And a couple of rounds of jacketed ammo after a box of lead does wonders in reducing the fouling and consequent need to clean same.
 
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