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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the process for the light, brilliant blue that I have seen on Colt Peacemaker guns? They are usually the screws and assorted parts and they look nothing like the traditional blue that I see in my own blued firearms. Is it expensive or delicate? Last time I was at the gun show I saw a couple of nice Colt .45s with this treatment.

Currently blued guns look more black to me. Have the manufacturers changes processes over the years? Thanks..........Mike
 

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The blue on the screws of the old peacemakers is a flame bluing process. YOu heat the part till it gets the color you want. Thats a very simple explanation, but it covers the basic process. It is a delicate blue. It was also called temper bluing. I'm surprised you asked the question since you had fire bluing in your topic post.

The darker blue/black you see now is from hot bluing. many years ago, before hot bluing, rust bluing was the order of the day.For looks there is nothing quite like rust bluing, but it is pretty labor intensive.

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if it flies it dies, if it runs it's done

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: peter Zahn on 2001-04-10 21:26 ]</font>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Pete for the explaination of the various bluing. Sorry for the misleading title of fireblue. I read that phrase here on the site and thought to myself "thats it, that Colt blue I've seen". I had never heard that term before so I just assumed and went with my question.

So, if fireblue isn't the bright blue that I have seen on Colts what is fireblue?....Mike
 

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I suspect fireblue is another term for the temper bluing, just a guess though.

I've recently become aware of something else. Brownells sells NitreBlue Bluing Salts. They say it gives fire-blue colors. Looks like it is very easy to use too. It's a hot process, 570 to 650 degrees.
 

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I just noticed that myself...This thread is eatin' at me for some reason...My poor, beat-up SA needs attention I guess...:wink:
 

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I had copy some pages from an old Luger book that has some details of the different temperatures and the color the different heat treat produce, such as straw, blue, purple-blue, etc... It also goes into some details about rust blueing; this takes anywhere from 4 to 7 days to complete, depending on the humidity. Anyway, if you're interested, I can did it up and post a summary here.

Thong
 

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Heated color Temp Temper item
of carbon steel

Faint yellow 420 knives,hammers
light yellow 440 reamers
straw yellow 460 dies punches
dark yellow 480 large taps
brown yellow 500 axes, drifts
full purple 540 cold chisels
full blue 560 springs gears
medium blue 600 spokeshaves
light blue 640
dark red 1290
cherry red 1650
orange red 2010
white 2550
blue white 2900
acetelyene flame 4080 HOT
electric arc light 7200 REALLY HOT
 
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