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I am (still) thinking of starting reloading, but I wondered, how much am I really going to save?

My standard load I would to be a 200gr 10mm at ~1000fps. I would want a good, hard-cast bullet to prevent leading and promote barrel life, and a good, clean powder.

I am interested in how much money I could save by reloading, and then weigh that against the time spent doing it.

Also, what is the cheapest source of 10mm ammo you have found? Georgia Arms has been the cheapest I've seen so far ($150 per 1000) but I have not used them. Are their lead reloads any good?

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: telackey on 2001-09-23 16:49 ]</font>
 

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At first, it will save you quite a bit. Later, you'll be spending about the same as you were before, just shooting a lot more.

I figured it out a few months ago. other than the brass, my reloads cost me about $3.50 a box (of 50) in components.

Time is another thing. Takes me a while 'cause I'm cheap (poor?). I load abvout 400 rounds a week on a single stage press. A good progressive press will save alot of time if you want to spend the money.

I kind of enjoy the reloading processes, so the time's not a big deal to me.

Dave
 

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The most common estimate that I have heard is that you can save anywhere from 50-75% of the cost of buying factory ammo.

A lot of factors go into that, including the quantities of components that you purchase at one time and shipping costs (if you buy online, for example).
 

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I will echo what the other guys said. The is an upfront investment in equipment and components, but you can either save at least 50% (probably more like 60-70% for 10mm) over retail ammo, or you can shoot a lot more for the same money. You also get the ability to tweak the load just the way you want it. Buying components in bulk is one key to getting maximum savings.
 

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I like Starline. The Remington nickel I have used in the past cracked at the case mouth after three to five reloads.

Tom
AF Shooting Team
 

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It really makes a big difference on what calibers you intend to load. You will save a pile of money if you are reloading exotics like the 440 CorBon Magnum, 41 Action Express, 44 AutoMag etc. If you are planning on loading something like 7.62x39, don't waste your time....you might as well buy it.
 

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To anwer your question, you need to answer mine:

HOW MUCH IS YOUR TIME WORTH?

Aside from the initial capital investment which must be offset by your savings, and, of course, the cost of the components themselves, the money saved is a direct corollary to the time you invest. If you do not have the time to:

1. Learn how to use your equipment;
2. Learn how to properly reload; and
3. Spend the time to set up the dies,
powder measure, etc, correctly;
research the load data for your
application, and follow the full
procedure;

Then you may be bettor off buying your ammo. Then again, most reloaders enjoy reloading for its own sake, as well as creating bullet/powder combos for special purposes and which work very well in their guns, which choices are not available buying factory loads.

Just remember that time has a value, and it is that value which creates the reloading "savings."
 

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I can load 1000rds of .45 for approximately $70. Compared to $200 dollars if I bought it several boxes at a time ($10 per box). If you buy via mail order or online 1000rds cost approx $150. I live in California, which doesn't allow mail order sales of ammunition so I am stuck with buying from retail outlets.

With that said, I can honestly tell you that you will save no money at all, and might even spend a little more. What will happen once you start reloading, is you end up shooting a lot more.

As for your time question, once I started reloading I found that I really enjoyed it. Just another way to enjoy shooting and collecting firearms, and the time I invested seem to matter less.
 

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telackey,

Lots of great response so far.

One thing I'll toss out... by all means look for a good deal on good gently used reloading equipment. This will minimize initial start-up investment.

A few years back I placed a free ad in my local gun collectors newsmagazine. I got several calls from guys wanting to offload their reloading equipment. I had my pick of the litter and ended up making a whale of a deal on an almost complete package (lacked a couple of small essentials like a caliper) and the guy also threw in several die sets, four reloading manuals, and a lot of excellent components. I got all this equipment (mostly RCBS) for about 33% mail-order new price. I easily recouped all my initial equipment investment in under one year.

Shop around. Lots of people buy all the necessary equipment and then it just collects dust.

To answer your question... I'd say I can easily cut costs 50%, probably closer to 75%, depending on the components I choose to use. In terms of quality control, I have never had one of my own reloads misfire (can't say that for factory). In terms of accuracy, I can equal or beat factroy handgun ammo easily, and with rifle it is absolutely no contest.

Take the plunge! :smile:

NW
 

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I live in California, which doesn't allow mail order sales of ammunition so I am stuck with buying from retail outlets.
I live in CA and buy from cheaper-than-dirt all the time. Midway will also ship ammo here.

My experience is that you can save a little money on handgun ammunition over many thousands of rounds. I shoot a lot of 45-70 and could never afford *good* factory ammo. Plus, I have a wide selection of bullet types available to me as a hand loader.

I actually really like reloading any ammo. Sure, it's rote and repetative, but it is a fun way to tinker a couple of hours a month and there is something about shooting ammo that you assembled yourself.
 

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I find the savings to be moot as I now am able to shoot 2 or 3 times as much and not worry about the cost. For me just getting out in the shop and loading is a great way to block out all those daily stresses. I always sleep better after loading, maybe it's the nitro in my blood.
 

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I have a spreadsheet (Excel) that will calculate your cost per box (50 for pistol, 20 for rifle) that I would be glad to email you. You input your component costs and it calculates the cost. Not counting my time and equipment investment, I am saving about 50 to 60% per box.
 

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Here is waht you need. I just ran by this excel spreadsheet that someone made just to answer your question. I would fill in all of the data in the spread sheet and post it for you but I have a lot of factors that won't apply to your situation. One I cast my own bullets and two I have had most of my equipment for over 15 years and don't remember what I paid for over 1/2 of it.



Enough rambling here is where I found the spread sheet at Glocktalk.
http://glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=78745
 

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So how much do you shoot now? How much do you plan to shoot in the future?

I wouldn't recommend setting you to reload for just one box of ammo every month or two. But if you're shooting a box a week you'll recoup your investment pretty fast.
 

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When I bought my Dillon 550B and the various insundry items to load one caliber, I figured it would take 50 boxes of ammo (45acp) to break even. That is I saved enough to offset the reloading tools cost. I buy case lots of primers ($65/5000). Pool orders with other shooters for bullets ($14/500). And in most cases use range brass or buying one time fired brass ($12 to $50/1000). I shoot about 150 to 500 rounds a week. And.... I work for myself for free! That is I don't worry what my time is worth when engaged in a hobby. When you start buying dies and tools for limited use firearms like antiques and hunting guns your investment per round fired can go up quite high, more even than the cost of the store bought stuff. You may find that once the initial investment is made, you will find things like bullet casting and tinkering with accuracy enhancing minueta of interest to you. I know I did. I found I like heavy 45Colt and 47-70 lead bullet loads. At the time nobody loaded comparable loads commercialy, so I made them myself. This of course led to a chronograph and a portable bench and then a benchrest quality rifle rest, etc, etc. Good luck!
 
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