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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I put a used Colt MK IV Series 80 on layaway. Its the blued Government model that is bone stock as far as I could tell. About the only think wrong with it was a minor scratch on the frame, but thats no prob cause its going to be a build up. The gun seems like it was never fired or the owner just took real good care of it. Total w/ tax and everything came out to be $520 and I am wondering if I got ripped off or is it a steal? Also, what do you guys think about using this as a base gun or should I continue to look for a Series 70?
 

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Sounds like the price is about right. It's perfectly fine as a base pistol if you don't mind having the Series 80 safety and having to deal with it if you need to detail strip your slide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dont I feel dumb? Thought I could get some input here on my purchase. Seeing as I have this post all to myself, I guess I can ramble about something. To date, I have a Belgium Hipower, Para 14-45 Limited, Springfield Loaded Full Size, Kimber Stainless Gold Match, Sig 220, Sig 229, Benelli Super 90, Fab Arms Silver Lion, and now the upcoming Colt purchase. Never owned a Colt before, but I think it will do just fine. Going between handguns is a chore cause I tend to favor the 1911's more everyday. The Sigs are great, dont get me wrong, but its just that whole feel you get with a 1911 and of course the initial trigger pull. Only difference between them is about a 1" group at around 20 yds. Out of the ones I have now, I like the Kimber the best. The para will shoot just as good (and sometimes better) groups, but I got small hands and I get better hand position with a single stack. Both are stainless and I know they will scratch ( but havent been YET) but I like the look. The Hipower is a recent addition to my collection. The thing is so smooth and easy to work with. After shooting mostly .40 and .45, this makes my first 9mm to date. Still has stock sights and everything and will stay that way for a bit longer till I get more funds. The groupings I get from the Hipower are comparable to the Sig and on some days it will shoot as good as my Kimber (I know what you are saying, its me right?). The work horse of the bunch has to be the Springfield. This one I use for rapid fire drills, concealment draw practice, and whatnot. It has parkewrized finish which is coming off a little, but hey, its going to be a work gun so little blemishes dont bother me. A few little changes made to it are basic Ed Brown parts (FLGR, plug, ISMI Spring, Bushing, Slide Release, Wilson Mag Well) and trigger is still stock (damn heavy) and it shows compared with the Kimber which is about a 4 and my Para with a 3 pound pull. I call it the runt of the bunch, but it does pick up the slack. Maybe cause Ive shot it the most but I get more consistant groupings and well placed shots than with the others (maybe I should show more TLC with the Kimber?) averaging close to 2 3/4 " groups anywhere from 15 to 25 yds. Of course, anyone can hit 1" groups at 5 to 10 :grin: . The kick isnt that bad, but the Fab arms stock is a little bit long so I may have it shortened. The Fab Arms is an over-under, which means I constantly have to reload the thing, but the Benelli is just sweet. KA-Click. So far, I have yet to buy a riffle, which is on my A-list of things to buy. Lookinbg at a Remington 700 Sendero, an AR-15, HK-91 or maybe a Winchester model 70. Dunno what to get yet, but it will be for hunting (and im not talking about Florida game, which is basically a dog with antlers).
Something big, maybe a moose, an 8 or 10 point buck, or if I have some spare change, a Safari Hunt through Mombasa Trading (do they still offer them?). Honestly, they are things I could be doing with my money like upgrading the car, new lawn mower, etc. but hell, I enjoy going to the range and I like my toys. Well, I have 4 weeks before I get my Colt and if I could get some input from someone that owns one or maybe a before and after pic, that would be great. Be well.

-bufford5
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Doh! Hi Mute :smile: Thought no one was going to post and while I was writing, you were nice enough to. Thanks man.
 

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Bufford - Massad Ayoob thinks highly of the 80 series with the additional safety. Many 1911 smiths don't seem to favor them although many still will do work on them. I believe Ayoob favors them for LE work and for their drop proofness over a non-80 series version.

EricO
 

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:grin: Don't worry about it bufford. I personally favor the Series 70s. I've not had many pleasant experiences with Series 80 Colts. However, if the gun is going to be customized anyway, the Series 80 will be just fine as a base gun. They were still well built and the steel was top quality. I think they just had some QA issues with final assembly.
 

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I think the only negative remarks I read were from Richard Heinie on the 1911 forum.com...

It had something to do with the slide cuts for the disconnector I think...If you do a search over there in the Gunsmithing Forum, you may be able to find the remarks...It was the one with Heinie, Vickers, Burns and a few others...You might try that and see what pops up...:wink:
 

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The disconnector cut problem was never described in detail even after I asked about it.

I have never heard of problems resulting from the disconnector notch in series 80.

I almost exclusive shoot series 80 Colts and would definately recommend them over most others.
 

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I have never had an issue against the series 80. I consistently get 3 1/2 - 4 lb. trigger pulls, and I don't consider the series 80 pieces to be any hinderance at all.

Yes, I would consider having them removed if my guns were bullseye shooters, but they are not, and I actually like the additional protection the series 80 offers against AD.
 

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I mentioned it just for the fact that Mr. Heinie did...I'm not a smith but he has some rep as one...I'll never put enough rounds through one to break it or wear it out.

There are some of us who will...:wink:
...and then some. Personally, I'd like to have 5 of them...one for each day of the work week and something a little "dressy" for the weekend...

:wink:
 
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Richard was speaking, I believe, of the thin RH web of the disconnector slot. As the series 80 firing pin plunger interrupts the left side web, the RH side can take a beating from the hammer.
I've seen them so badly peened as to interfere with the disconnector, preventing the firing of the gun.
My solution has to been to machine the bearing surface of the hammer face, to a longer, more parallel plane (as veiwed cocked).
Of course, this also reduces hammer over-cock, and is a better technique for some hammers over others.
I like stock Colt or Wilson's premium hammers.
This has eliminated the peening prob for me, and leads to increased life of the trigger job, due to reduced overcocking,
IMHO.
 

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Thanks for clearin' that up Chuck...:wink:
 

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In answer to the original question, I think you did rather well. I would have gladly paid $520 in your place ... perhaps even a bit more. It always seems tougher to say no after you actually get the pistol in your hands. :smile:

Everyone seems to have their own opinion about the Series 80 drop safety system, but I don't really have a problem with it myself. Admittedly, I've never had a Series 80 built up to custom specs, but in terms of daily "stock" carry, I certainly don't object to the extra security it provides. Unnecessary perhaps, but I can live with the minimal effects it may be having upon my trigger squeeze.

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
On 2001-04-13 18:42, StormMaster wrote:
In answer to the original question, I think you did rather well. I would have gladly paid $520 in your place ... perhaps even a bit more. It always seems tougher to say no after you actually get the pistol in your hands. :smile:



Chuck
After I picked it up, I couldnt let go. Im glad to hear that I didnt make a wrong decision this time. Seems like averything I do nowadays seems wrong. Good thing for a change. :smile:
 

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B5,

I don't blame you one bit. Maybe your luck is finally a'changin' :smile:

Chuck
 
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