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I see that Wilson has come out with a polymer framed replica of a 1911. What for? I thought that Wilson was a pretty good maker of 1911s, but this is a letdown for us purists. Was this idea spawned by the desire to give the buyer three more rounds in the clip? A double stack 1911 does not feel like a 1911 to me, and a lot of guys I know. Friends don't let friends buy plastic guns.
 

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I really don't know the answer to your question, it is a good one though. I believe Wilson wanted to keep up with traffic and be able to offer a polymor gun. My understanding is it was developed in south africa and completed in the USA. Just a pure marketing decision to offer what the current market wanted. I ordered one and then backed out because of features more than anything. It would have been non-standard from a 1911 as to magazines and I just didn't want that hassel. The up side is the gun would be light weight, folks would like that. I understand it is a good product but not my cup of tea.
 

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I see that Wilson has come out with a polymer framed replica of a 1911. What for?
Plastic is lighter than steel and rustproof as well. There's also no need for grip panels so the thickness of the frame can be reduced.

Making a 10 round pistol that's no thicker than an original M1911 isn't such a bad thing, IMHO. The biggest drawback that I see is that Wilson is the sole source of magazines.

BTW, isn't anyone going to complain about the external extractor? :smile:
 

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I have one and like it just fine. It's got a nice balance of size and weight. It shoots just as accurately (off hand) as my CQB, in my hands. The fit is even better than my CQB. However, the grip feel is a little blockier than a standard 1911. With its 10 rd mag, my KZ keeps me warm at night.....
 

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I would think that they are doing it because they've found a demand for one. I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to the 1911 and still prefer all steel and wood grips, but I think Wilson should be given credit for listening to it's buyer, if indeed that's what fueled the idea of making a polymer high cap version of their guns.
 

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Is the slide coated in wilsons polymer(wilsontuff or something like that) or does he use something more weather resistant. I dont own a Wilson but remember reading complaints about the finish wearing quickly. I like metal guns but if it works well I could learn to love after all it looks a heck of a lot better than a glock
 

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The biggest drawback that I see is that Wilson is the sole source of magazines.
A valid point, certainly. Still, I couldn't help but find some humor in it, since Wilson's is pretty much the sole source for 1911 magazines already -- at least the ones worth having. It is awfully hard to beat a range bag full of 47D's! :smile:

Anyway, to get back on topic, while I don't object to the KZ concept, I've still never warmed up to the idea of a plastic gun. Composites may be the wave of the future, but the older I've gotten, the more I've come to appreciate the time-tested classics -- rendered in wood and steel, and carried in leather.

Chuck
 

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I believe the motivation behind this gun was to produce an economical .45 for competition, IDPA, etc. Those of us who shoot the various disciplines, like to have 10 rounds in a major caiblre. Anyway, many of the newer shooters, who shoot glocks, but who hate the trigger and sights are looking for an alternative, and Kimber, Wilson ,etc are trying to capture that market. Very simple.
 

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On the other hand, if it has cutouts at the rear of the trigger guard, an arched MSH, visible sights, anything but a "tab" thumb safety, or lacks a lanyard loop, it's not a 1911 either.

"Purist" is an interesting term, but ask yourself, what would JMB carry if he were alive today? What kind of guns would he be building? Do you think he'd still be doing the same ol' same ol' or do you think he'd be making the most of the different materials available to the modern gun designer?

Before you answer, consider how much of a "revolutionary" he was during his lifetime.
:wink:
 
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