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If you had your choice of buying 2 new Kimbers for approx. the same price as 1 new Wilson CQB, what would you choose? Please give details one way or another. The Kimbers if bought would not stay stock for very long as I like to have my .45's tricked out a bit. The Kimbers I'm looking at are the CompactII/blue steel and the CustomII/blue steel.
 

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I'd buy one Kimber, save the money meant for the second and send it to a good smith to make it something that's even nicer than the Wilson. It'd probably cost a little more than the Wilson though.
 

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I believe the choice should be based upon your purpose: for sport shooting, the Kimbers are okay. If you require a gun for long term reliability, I think I'd recommend Wilson.

I have a Kimber Eclipse. I have replaced the factory MIM hammer/sear/disconnector set with EdBrown parts. Just did a final tweak on the sear/hammer surfaces this morning - will be test firing my work later today. I have also noticed that my Plastique MSH is failing - the spring retaining pin is being pushed upwards and the upper surface of the housing has a bump.....

IMO, Both manufacturers produce products of quality equally proportional to their price.

Regards :smile:
 

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I have several different answers to your question. If I could only AFFORD the one wilson or the two kimbers then I would get the wilson. If I could afford one wilson or two kimbers but then be able to have Dane work over the two kimbers then I would get the two kimbers. Either two of the exact same gun so I would have a spare OR one fullsize steel gun and then a compact set up identically but in a LW format and have that set up identically to the full-size one.

But there are LOTS of considerations here. Is money the deciding factor? In the beginning of your post it sounds like it is, but then later you say you will be having them both worked over if you get the kimbers, so it seems you have money to spend.

What I would do (What I did in your place actually) is this: I would figure out what your requirements were and then have Dane (or your smith of choice) build you a gun from the ground up with the best parts available. I have been down the semi-custom gun road a few times, and each time when it was over I was so happy because I could think, "Wow, this is so much closer to what I really want than it would have been if I had left it stock - this is great." Then one day I added up the money I had spent getting close a few times and realized that I could have already bought a custom gun built only for me based on my needs and wants. So I am doing it now. Its gonna take a year to get it and its going to cost me 3 grand, but I can almost promise you that during that year I would have gone through about ten "this is honest to goodness the gun for me pistol" examples and still be looking and selling and trading and losing money each time. And I probably would have spent a few thousand bucks in the process.

Of course, if this one doesn't work out I am just going to donate the burns gun to the "drooling gun lover's home" and buy a .380 lorcin, file off the sights and call it even.

But, perhaps a nice compromise is this: CQB's run about 1750 and up I think. I would get a new kimber for 750 and send it to Dane (or Mr. Heinie or any of the great smiths that are out there) and ask him to make it a thousand bucks better.

Good luck and please let us know how it works out.

Jake

_________________
A bad attitude or unsettled mind will destroy focus, guaranteeing failure regardless of training and preparation.
- Mark F. Twight, "Extreme Alpinism"

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Jake Salyards on 2001-09-23 10:59 ]</font>
 

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I'd lean towards geting the Kimber and then having it done over by a no-kidding excellent gunsmith. Wilson Combat makes a great product, but there is nothing like having a gun made exactly how you want it.
 

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I think it depends on what the gun is for. If this is a self defense gun, buy the Kimbers, replace the MIM and plastic parts if they have any, make sure they have good triggers and good sights and that they run. Find a load that works for you in your guns then shoot them a lot.

It depends on whether you want to be good with your guns or you just want to collect really cool guns. You can do both, but it is expensive and very expensive guns will not make you a better pistolero.

However, if you are just collecting guns for the drool, ooh and aah factor, get all 3 and spend another 5 grand fixing them up. Start collecting Heinie, Vickers and Burns guns. Post pictures of them and say gee whiz ain't I lucky. Keep them in the safe where no harm can come to them.

Or you can tell me I am full of crap. I get that a lot. :smile:

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"When great changes occur in history, when great principles are
involved, as a rule the majority are wrong. The minority are right."
Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926)

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: BillD on 2001-09-23 17:49 ]</font>
 

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after owning Both, for my money today i would get a kimber at $600, add another $600 on all tool steel parts and heinie sights, and another $600 for 3000 rounds for practice. Wilsons are great guns but a kimber with the right tweaks is awesome and costs less.
 

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Might help to know Kimber makes both Wilson's frame and slide....

Parts don't make the gun, who puts it together does.

Kimber is getting better at doing so everyday.

There are a bunch of folks that should and are not taking note of that fact.
 

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If you don't have the money (or the inclination to spend the money) to get a custom piece a basic Kimber will probably be an excellent weapon. And perfect practice does make perfect. But for all that, a better weapon is still better. How's that for profound? :grin:

I had a Kimber and odds are that the Kimber will give you all the accuracy and reliability you need out of the box, or with the most modest of tinkering. However, there ARE things you can do to improve the reliability and ensure it STAYS reliable in the longer term. Also, there are things that can be done to improve the ergonomics and shootability of the piece that can pay real, no-kidding dividends... i.e. better sights and a better trigger.

My favored firearm is a quasi-custom Colt Delta Elite. The changes made to it not only made the gun more accurate "in theory," but made me demonstrably more accurate actually shooting the thing. IMHO it doesn't take THAT high a level of skill for a shooter to shoot better with an "optimized" weapon. Otherwise, I'd just suggest that everyone carry a Glock and be done with it. :grin:
 

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spend the rest of the money on a Rangemaster 3 or 5 day course.
Worth noting two of the three guys who teach those classes shoot pretty basic Kimbers and shoot them VERY well :grin:

I am forced by my real profession to shoot something a little different.



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Dane Burns on 2001-09-24 00:08 ]</font>
 

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On 2001-09-23 23:38, Dane Burns wrote:

Worth noting two of the three guys who teach those classes shoot pretty basic Kimbers and shoot them VERY well :grin:

I am forced by my real profession to shoot something a little different.



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Dane Burns on 2001-09-24 00:08 ]</font>
Dane, your "real" job is the Super Stealthy Tactical Ninja, right?
I had a chance to do a long term test drive Tom Givens Kimber. It was indeed only lightly customize, but it was 100% reliable.
 

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I would buy a used Kimber, have seen them in the low 400's, then send it to Dane and have it built the way it should have been built originally.

Learned the hard way here, bought a Gold Combat...and then actually had Dane build the gun I *thought* I had bought. Never again will I pay for any factory "package". Having done so many times, it is a waste of money.
 

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On 2001-09-23 23:38, Dane Burns wrote:
[quote:2b1o3f4x]
spend the rest of the money on a Rangemaster 3 or 5 day course.
Worth noting two of the three guys who teach those classes shoot pretty basic Kimbers and shoot them VERY well :grin:

I am forced by my real profession to shoot something a little different.



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Dane Burns on 2001-09-24 00:08 ]</font>
[/quote:2b1o3f4x]

Man! Those little dancing kids must be getting tougher everyday.
 

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On 2001-09-24 08:20, mcgrubbs wrote:
Glock Racer-nice hardware!!

Ricky T- well said. There are alot of first time gun buyers that would be well served by your words.
Even nicer when I get back the stainless Kimber shown on the pic from Dane. Kimber FED, Barsto barrel, "Wave" grip system, solid Videki trigger, tulip wood grips. Ahhh... ain't nothin' like a BCP 1911...
 

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While taking a Rangemaster course I was lucky enough to have an extractor failure on my Kimber Custom CDP. Tom gave me his pistol to finish the days shooting. It was a slightly customized (sights and fitting) Kimber Custom Classic. I would have sworn that the slide rode on ball bearings. The trigger was so sweet that I kept double tapping when I didn't mean to.
Kimber makes nice sidearms.
 
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