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My general opinion of Lee reloading equipment is quite low, having set up a friend's Lee progressive. But I have heard a few good thing about their Factory Crimp Dies, which I understand combine a final resizing operation with taper crimping. I am thinking of putting one on my Dillon 1050 (.45 ACP) to replace the Dillon TC die. Anyone out there have any comments?
Bill Go
 

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Here is what my 1050 toolheads wear for dies.

EGW Undersize Sizing Die
Redding Competition In-Line Seating die
Lee Factory Crimp die

All of the above worth their weight in gold. Since roll sizing all my brass and switching to this set-up, ammo problems have been a thing of the past. Good luck to you.

Tom
AF Shooting Team
 

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I'm setup on my 650 for 38 Super but I'm using a Lee UNDER sizing die, a Redding bullet seater, and a Dillon TC die. I'm nat having any problems at all. when I do load 45 and 40, I use all Dillon dies. I've never had a problem with using dillon Taper Crimps. My problem has always been on bulging cases. I've fixed that problem with a CasePro.
 

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Lee factory taper crimp die is a must for any lead bullet reloads, and I use them also for jacketed bullets. They will "gauge" if you set the die correctly. I then crimp in a second station after running the round through the lee for sizing the lead bullet. I have another station for it. It works for me. DougC
 

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The only Lee product I have is the Lee FC Die. I use it on my 9mm, 38Super and 45. I was having an unacceptable rate of reloads that would not gauge with the 38Super. This problem has all but disappeared. I recently ran a lot of 600 without a single round failing to gauge. Before I installed the Lee FC my rate was anywhere from 10 - 15% fallout. I was so impressed from this I put one on both the 9mm and 45 just as a preventative measure. This is not a knock on Dillon Dies, the Lee FC is simply a better mousetrap.
 

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I used to use a Lee factory crimp die for reloading .223's for machine guns, but it had to be adjusted down all the time as it wore out rather quickly. Eventually it was screwed down so far the die body would hit the shoulder and push it back. What a POS. Also the collet would sometimes get hung up on the case and it would pull it out the bottem of the die body. The Dillon crimp die is much better.
 

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Tony,
The Lee FCD die for bottleneck cases is a different design than the FCD for straight wall cases. The bottleneck FCD need a little "fluff and buff". I like to take them apart, polish the inside and outside of the collet, and polish the inside of the taper that squeezes the collet. Then I put some moly lube on the outside of the collet. I've found it makes the bottleneck FCD run smooth.

The straight wall FCD is great. It makes a nice firm crimp and as others have pointed out, it does a final sizing to remove any bulges and such. I use a lot of "range brass" and have found quite a few 40 S&W's that have pretty good sized bulge at the base. I remove the adjustment stem and crimping sleeve from the FCD die and push the brass all the way through. I refer to this as "super sizing". I believe it achieves the benefits of roll sizing without the expense. My spud for pushing the brass all the way through is a spent 223 case. I use a 223 shell holder, place a 223 case in the press, invert the 40 brass on the 223 and cycle the press. This "super sizing" is only done once to newly acquired range brasss. Using this method coupled with the lower USPSA power factors, I haven't had any problems using the "super sized" brass.
YMMV
 

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I use a Dillon RL550B press. My Sig P220, and 1911 occasionally have the same problem: Using my 200 LSWC load, the slide fails to completely close, and chamber the round. Some of my loads do not freely drop into a case gauge...they need a little tap. I think that is why I have the problem in both guns. I bought a Lee FC die, and put it in my single stage press. I ran those same loads through that die, and they all dropped into the gauge!

I guess what I'm asking is this: Do you guys think I should try replacing the station with the Dillon TC die, with the Lee FC die?
 

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I have a Lee FC die on my .40 and .45 toolheads for my Dillon 650. They are great. I used to occasionally have rounds that would not gauge but have eliminated the problem with the addition of the $10 Lee part.
 

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What a great idea, Roger_Dailey!
I had been thinking about doing exactly that to the .40 S&W cases that are left lying around, but was imagining using a special turning to fit in the shell holder and pushing them through mouth first.After reading your post, I took a piece of 3/16's brass rod, cut it to 2 1/2 inches, and simply used a .40 case in the shell holder to cup it and pushed my miscellaneous pick up cases through backwards. It works like a charm on everything but Lake City brass which I discard. (I also lube these cases)
Good thinking! By the way, I use the Lee Factory Crimp die to salvage about 80% of my 9mm and .45ACP which fail to gauge. It's a useful item for the high volume reloader.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: WalterB on 2001-12-09 21:11 ]</font>
 
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