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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I felt inspired by these home workshop posts so earlier this week I picked up a box stock Colt Delta Gold Cup from JM10mm.
My Brownells order came on Friday night with all of the various parts, files and tools.
I have read about.
I should have picked up a manual or "how to" book so I did the next best thing I took out a few of custom guns eyed each part up used my micrometer and went from there.

I used all of these parts:

Brown Memory Groove series 80 SS beavertail
Brown SS tactical Ambi safety
Egw SS over size slide stop
Brown SS extended ejector
Brown SS plunger tube
Hardcore SS Hammer and Perfection sear.
Brown match disconnector
STI strut and cap
Brown mag catch lock
Videcki Series 80 GC match trigger
McCormick tactical checkered mag catch
Brown 30lpi wedge housing
Wolff sear, plunger, mag release, and hammer springs.
Nowlin replacement grip bushing
Tri Wing grip screws
Ahrends rosewood tactical grips.

I was actually quite surprised at how much fitting is required with all of the "over the counter" parts.

The hardest part was removing all of the machining marks inside the dustcover and frame, polishing the trigger track and mag catch race way seemed to take forever.
The second hardest part was fitting the Beavertail and grip safety so that when the lever is in the up position you do not see that "awful" hole.

I assembled the stock (for now) top end and then realized that the Colt series 80 parts were providing drag so I mirror polished and jeweled them.
I final polished every moving part all the way to fine white jewelers rouge and my trigger breaks perfectly @ 3.5lbs. I could feel a very slight hint of "creep" /friction or something like that until I isolated it to the non-polished hammer strut scraping the inside of the MSH tube.
I then mirror polished the inside of the MSH and the strut, the resulting pull dropped to 3.2lbs.
I noticed that while I need to do this trigger job on about 35 of my custom 1911s now as I now hate them all.....

It still felt odd, like something was not quite right as I wnated my trigger to break like the 2lb PSG1.
After careful examination I isolated it to the trigger bow, so I mirror polished the trigger bow and the contact surfaces of the mag catch.
The pull is now perfect at 3lbs and it does literally feel like I am snapping a glass rod.

I brazed the plunger tube on and silver soldered the trigger stop screw in place.

I cut the oversize ejector so that it tosses all of the brass about 1’ beyond my right shoulder, I used the photo in AH of Larry’s gun for the angle then reproduced it on my ejector.

I used the Brownells slide fitting bars and the Brownells ball peen hammer, and then I used the no mar lapping compound to smooth the tightened and fit slide so that it rolls along very smoothly.
I can see how you could easily mess this part up, how do most of you guys tighten the slide fit? Is their an easier way?

I also beveled the underside of the slide rails as in the AH article and smoothed all of the sharp edges, it was a lot harder to do than it would seem as I had to keep changing the angle of my dremel and vise a few degrees at a time so I did not radically alter the edge geometry of each line as I did not want it to be apparent that the pistol had been beveled heavily.
It feels so much better in my hand now that I am still amazed as the Colt frame had sharp edges literally everywhere.

I shot it for several hours this morning and I am undecided as to checker, stipple or serrate the front strap? After shooting my N frames for almost 1,000 rds yesterday I really expected the silvertips to beat on my hands a little.

But, I was really surprised at how “easy” the gun now feels in recoil, it must be either the ultra smooth slide frame fit without galling/rubbing now or the very high grip of the Brown memory groove?

Let me know what you guys think and I will post an update as I move along.
My bead blasting cabinet and milling equipment should be here this week and I am excited to try it out, also how do most guys find this "home gunsmithing" to be?

Next weekend I will undercut the front strap, install a new Barsto 10mm barrel with OD bushing, Aftec extractor, Wilson BP oversize slide stop, firing pin and sights.

It took me 14 hours do everything so far as I have gone very slow so as not to make any mistakes.

How much should I expect to improve with practice?

I am having fun but, it has also made me appreciate the serious amount of work that goes into building these custom guns by the real gunsmiths.

here is a pic of the frame in progress:


_________________
Think, Plan, Train, Be Safe.
Thanks
David



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: David DiFabio on 2001-07-08 19:59 ]</font>
 

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Once again...You are absolutely, the busiest guy I have ever heard of!

Congratulations!

WoW...You are really on your way!
Sheesh...you'll be gettin' calls before you know it...Better watch it...You'll have to go to "work" for a livin'... :wink:
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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>g2<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

..!...then, we fight in the shade!..

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: gyp_c2 on 2001-07-08 19:41 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: gyp_c2 on 2001-07-08 20:04 ]</font>
 

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Very nice David! You got alot done in 14 hours, took me 4 weeks and I didn’t get into all the stuff you did :smile:
The home made projects have a special place don’t they? Even if you have nice custom guns.
like to see it complete, ask the home entertainment committee for more garage time :smile:
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys,
As to the time line, I have a serious advantage over 90% of the population.
I started forgoing sleep while in millitary school in my teens and then during various hell weeks in the service, during those "tough" times my habit made them almost easy to endure.
This allows me to spend 16-20 hours per day working,I sleep 4 hours per day.
In this way I am able to get a lot of stuff done.

I think I got it done/almost done by working straight through, I have an extremely strong sense of detail and concentration and I can literaly meld myslef to the work at hand.
It is impossible to disuade my focus once I have made upo my mind to do something and this gunsmithing at home stuff appealed to me.

Throw in the fact that it is for fun and I am not in a rush and it makes the project a very serious stress reliever.

I will say that I like it so far, I really enjoy working with my hands and it was fun to detail/blue print my gun listing each measurement for the parts and pins.

I have not had this much since I powder coated my show trucks entire undercarriage/frame/axles and parts.
 

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David:
Looks good so far! I'm glad that you were able to properly fit everything without the aid of any manuals. I did use my Yanek 1911 extensively as a sort of 3-D manual, so I imagine having a good selection of custom guns is just about as good as having some manuals.

I didn't keep track of how many hours it took me, but it was quite substantial. I didn't use my Dremel for very much on my project, so it took much longer to do.

If you are getting a mill, then perhaps acquiring one of the Keller Kustom Ballistics checkering fixtures would be useful for doing the front straps. I've been learning hand checkering, and it's quite painful. I don't relish putting in the requisite hours to become really proficient at it.

Have fun and keep us posted!

_________________
DBS

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Hilton Yam on 2001-07-08 21:22 ]</font>
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Jm,
I think it is really happy now, I am going to undercut the front strap tonight/tommorrow as time permits.

Besides, they don't allow "Cool" guns in the republic of NJ anymore....:wink:
 

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David:

Very nice work you've done over the weekend. I'd recommend you attach the shop vac to the blast cabinet if yours doesn't have a built-in dust collector to keep the dust down. It's tough enough to see thru the window. Also, make yourself a little shelf to hold all the parts inside the cabinet so you can minimize the number of times you'll need to open the cabinet door. I've had good luck with Aluminum oxide in 220 grit for getting a very nice medium gray matte finish on stainless steel. Have fun.

Thong
PS. Kuhnhausen vol I & II on the 1911 would also be handy references (I've got mine thru Brownells).

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: TCao on 2001-07-09 20:19 ]</font>
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info, I do intend to connect to my shop vac, another person advised that Walnut sheels provide a nice sheen..??
 

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David,

When you get done, I REALLY think you should send me the gun, so I can go through it and make sure its okay. Like you I'm very detailed in what I do, I just take a little longer to do it :wink: I figure it will take me about 5 years, at which time I will PROMPTLY return it to you :lol:
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
JLM,
That sounds like a great plan except for three points:

1. It is in 10mm or commonly referred to as "the caliber of the gods"...

2. I took the time to build it the way Colt should have from the start.

3. It's mine and I'm not sharing :smile:
 

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D: I don't have first hand exp with using walnut shells for polishing metals. Fine glass beads (mesh size of 170-325 or 100-170) will give you very nice sheen too--surface finish in the 50 to 100 microinches rms. Also, air pressure and angle and distance of nozzle will have effects on final finish. HTH
TC
 

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On 2001-07-11 19:13, TCao wrote:
D: I don't have first hand exp with using walnut shells for polishing metals. Fine glass beads (mesh size of 170-325 or 100-170) will give you very nice sheen too--surface finish in the 50 to 100 microinches rms. Also, air pressure and angle and distance of nozzle will have effects on final finish. HTH
TC
What distance will you use the finer grade from? Guidelines only...This is small stuff...
 

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On 2001-07-08 20:51, David DiFabio wrote:
I have not had this much fun since I powder coated my show trucks entire undercarriage/frame/axles and parts.
ALL RIGHT!!!! Finally, someone out there who's more compulsive than me!!!

-Shane calls to wife - "Honey, come here and look at what Dave did, will ya? See - I'm not the only one who's obsessive/compulsive to the point of being anal!"

I believe completely in your philosophy of doing things completely, properly and thoroughly - and you are going to have a GREAT gun as a result. I like what I'm seeing and reading so far - keep us posted. :smile:
 

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Yeah but he didn't mention doing his hair from the sheen on the slide flats like you do... :lol:


yuk...
 

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On 2001-07-13 12:46, gyp_c2 wrote:
Yeah but he didn't mention doing his hair from the sheen on the slide flats like you do... :lol:


yuk...
OH MY GOD!!!! I am compulsive! I got a big smear of Brownell's Action Lube on my face a couple weeks ago at the range - guess what I used for a mirror to make sure I got it all off?




<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Shane Kropf on 2001-07-13 13:21 ]</font>
 

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gyp_c: I usually keep the gun about 3 inches from the work piece and around 90 deg angle for the fine glass beads or the a/o stuff. Regulator set at around 90 psi for the suction type blast guns.
TC
 
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