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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First I want to say I am a proud owner of a Glock19 but I want a 45caliber and none of their 45's fit me wright,and I am in love with the 1911s looks!Anyhow,I am looking for a pic of any brand 1911 with hard chromed slide but with a standard blued frame.I have seen many pics just the opposite but they just don't tickle my fancy!I am going with the blued Springfield for price reasons,in my neck of the woods I can get one new anywhere from $150-$200 cheaper than any compairable Colt or Kimber!With the extra money saved I will buy some goodies!Also want a pair of checkered ivory grips from Nutmegs,Can some one tell me how well ivory grips stand up in time?Thanks
 

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The reason you see so many blued slide with stainless or hard chromed frame (opposite of what you're looking for) is that the hand is in contact with the frame most of the time, and therefore has most chance of developing rust from sweat or blood. The chrome or stainless metal is much more resistant.

If you're going with the basic MilSpec Springfield, leave it alone and don't refinish it right away. Shoot it about 1,000 rounds of so and make note of any problems. You'll probably want, or need, to have some gunsmithing done to it as you become more familiar with it -- trust me, I almost ALWAYS have something to do with the MilSpec guns!

Then have any custom work done to it with the money you saved and have it refinished after that. If you go two-toned route, maybe consider Robar NP3 silver slide and Rogard black frame (since that's the color set up you desire).

As for Ivory, if you can afford it, then fine. I think genuine Ivory runs about $300 or more -- as much as you gun! May be better to save that money for gunsmithing or upgrade your base gun. If you mean fake ivory or pearlite grips then hey, whatever tickles your fancy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hoser,what are the most common problems that you have encountered with the basic mil-spec?What parts have you had to change?How do they compair in your oppion to the 1991A1 Colts?
 

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1911's as a whole are a funny bunch. Like women (or men if you're a woman forum member), each has it's own personality and quirks -- good and bad! Some people buy a fully loaded semi-custom 1911 that won't go 20 rounds without a failure and some buy the basic MilSpec that runs and shoot great. You can't anticipate it until you shoot yours and keep track of which ammo gives you problems and which shoot great.

Don't go cheap on the magazines though, they are the heart and soul of the semi auto. What do you have if you have ammo, the gun but a magazine that fails? A single shot pistol, that's what!

I haven't shot the SA MilSpec so I can't comment. I do have several series 80 Colt 1991A1's and have no problems with them at all. They've been great and, to be honest, expected problems from rumors that I've heard. But none have occured. Just personal taste on whether you want series 80 safety or not and there are other topics list on this forum that disuss that so I won't go into pro and con discussion here.

My carry guns are series 80 -- Colt Officers XS, LW enhanced Commander and a Combat Commander 1991A1. Target guns are usually not.

As for customizing, again, that's personal taste. As a matter of fact, my next project will be a SA MilSpec with match barrel, reliability and trigger job. That's it. I want to build a pistol that looks totally like a MilSpec gun but is target grade accurate. But I'm only doing this because I have others with the full treatment of beavertail, great sights, trigger jobs, etc.

You need to let us on the forum know what you want to do with the gun (self defense only, target shooting, carry gun, ect). There are much more informed and knowledgeable people on this forum than I that can probably have much more and detailed input once your useage is determined!

Just my 2 cents of importance: reliability, good sights (like Heinie, MMC or Novaks), trigger job, dehorning and accuracy -- in that order. This is a great forum and there are great gunsmiths and pros that will probably add much to what I've said. I'm an armchair quarterback compared to others on this site!

Good luck and hope I didn't go too long with this post! :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mostly for target shooting but I want it to be able to depend on it for self defense as was the case with my Glock which I myself was able to to a trigger job on ie: 3.5connector and spring.It has fired every time no misfeeds and I havent shot my foot as of yet.What is envolved in reducing the pull weight,is it just a matter of installing aftermarket parts or is it something that a gunsmith alone must do?The longer the post the better,thank of my mind as a sponge used to absorb info.Thanks for the info thus far!!!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: isaidme on 2001-05-29 20:50 ]</font>
 

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Dont do ANYTHING to it until you shoot it a few hundred rounds. The S/A mil spec is a very good choice for a base pistol. Some folks cry about the frame being to boxy, but i kinda like the extra steel, gives a smith more to cut on when you do decide to have work done :grin:

Any how, if you keep your eye on GunsAmerica, you will find mil specs for under $400 occasionally.

Matt
 

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If you noticed, RMLaney had the same advice we first discussed -- shoot it a lot first!

Don't "play" gunsmith on a 1911 (your Glock worries me and I HOPE you know what you're doing). I guess I say this for two reasons:

First, on a defense gun, you'd better be darn sure that the gun is safe and will not accidently discharge due to fiddling. OR accidently NOT discharge and risk your life and the life of your loved ones. Plus there's potential civil liability factor if your gun has been made "unsafe". As I'm sure many will attest, it takes a whole lot of years of gunsmithing to get one to run right and safe.

The second reason is that having a top name smith like Mr. Burns here on this site, or Vickers, Heinie, Garthwaite or Hoag (among others) will give you pride of ownership for a lifetime with no regrets. I don't recommend this, but IF you ever had to sell, a top smith having worked on it will be the only way you'll have a prayer of getting any of the money you put in the gun back out!

You made a great choice with the base gun (whether you did a lot of research or just made a lucky choice), now go forward carefully and wisely and safely. Don't get arrogant and think that you can gunsmith as good as the pro's based on reading MY sad input or input from others. YOU WILL NOT LEARN TO SMITH A 1911 BY READING. So unless you're willing to ruin many 1911's, go with a pro!

Enjoy and good shooting :smile:
 
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