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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Actually, a couple of questions.

Lou, I was looking at the photos on the RFHolsters page and noticed that many of your revolver holsters expose the trigger guard and trigger. I thought that was a no-no. I guess the question is, what's the rationale for that particular design element?

Second question. Just bought a S&W642 (thanks, Dick!) and was looking for holster/carry recommendations. The gun is a backup to a larger auto that I generally carry, so the concealment vs access ratio tips toward concealment. I was thinking a pocket holster or belly band. Any thoughts on the relative advantages of each?

Thanks!
Chad
 

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On 2001-08-17 12:00, Chad Ward wrote:
Actually, a couple of questions.

Lou, I was looking at the photos on the RFHolsters page and noticed that many of your revolver holsters expose the trigger guard and trigger. I thought that was a no-no. I guess the question is, what's the rationale for that particular design element?

**Chad, Some of those photos are not very clear on the R&F web site. All of our revolver holsters do cover the trigger enough that you can't get a finger into the trigger guard. On some of the holsters, like the Hideout, part of the guard is exposed, but that's the nature of the design to allow enough leather for the belt loop area. On our Belt slide holsters the trigger guard is about 3/4 covered, which is enough to cover almost all of the trigger. You couldn't get a finger in front of the trigger while the gun is in the holster.

Second question. Just bought a S&W642 (thanks, Dick!) and was looking for holster/carry recommendations. The gun is a backup to a larger auto that I generally carry, so the concealment vs access ratio tips toward concealment. I was thinking a pocket holster or belly band. Any thoughts on the relative advantages of each?

Thanks!
Chad
A pocket holster is a great choice for concealment, and is very fast to get a gun into action if you recognize the threat. You can have your hand on the gun without looking threating to anyone, and nothing is faster than that. I typically carry a J frome in a pocket holster during most of the summer months while wearing shorts.
An ankle holster is great for concealment because generally, people don't tend to look at the lower extremeties.
I wouldn't use it for a primary weapon, but for a backup it's ideal. Belly bands are also great for concealment, but limit access unless you are wearing a pull over style shirt. A tucked in shirt with buttons makes it very difficult to access the weapon, unless you leave a button or two undone to be able to reach in to access the gun. They are also hot and uncomfortable in hot weather IMO. Using a polo style shirt, I would choose an IWB holster, which can be just as concealable as a belly band, but without all the discomfort.
Lou


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Alessi Holsters, Inc.
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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Louis F. Alessi on 2001-08-18 00:17 ]</font>
 

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I've run into the same question about the exposed trigger on revolver holsters. IDPA as a body responded negatively to my query on my Hideout. However my local IDPA guy approved it, exposed trigger and all, for use in our local IDPA matches. In fact, he said something to the effect of 'it's from Lou Alessi, what could be wrong with it?'

But on to the question of whether or not it is safe to have an exposed trigger on a double action revolver holster. It was my understanding from that round of questioning, and correct me if I'm mis-remembering this Lou, but as a closely molded holster for a double action revolver there is really no danger as long as the gun is never holstered while cocked. And we don't do that anyway do we? Also, from my own thinking, as long as we maintain our straight index finger discipline it's a non-issue. Your finger doesn't belong on the trigger until you have identified the target and decided to destroy it. Until then it belongs outside the trigger guard, alongside the frame or on your predetermined index point.

Another thing to consider is that my Hideout also has the pull-through snaps as an extra measure of retention. This snaps securely behind the hammer and cannot be fastened without the revolver firmly seated in the holster, and of course not with the hammer back in the single action mode.

P.S. I also used this debate as an excuse to buy another of Lou's fine holsters, the Belt SLide Unit which is a pancake style holster. Whenever I shoot a match with the Hideout I usually have the BSU handy incase somebody wants to fuss about it. The carry angle pretty much identical except that the holster is carried on the waistband.

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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ShortRound on 2001-08-18 00:46 ]</font>
 
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