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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
looking at the 2 pistols, why would anyone pay $1000.00 more for the SDS pistol than the QCB. Other than a few differences and a .5 inch difference on accuracy .... it just does not seem to make much sense. Comments?
 

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Looking at my catalog the SDS has a heavy tactical cone barrel. Some feel this extra weight helps them recover quicker during double taps. I agree that .5 inch is nothing. Most folks can't hold the gun that good and outside of a Ransom rest the difference can not be seen.

This is whats great at Wilson's, pay your money and take your pick.

Long live the 1911
MOLON LABE
 

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The CQB compact also has the heavy cone barrel, so that isn't the difference. It is the model with the 1.5" accuracy where as the full-size has 1.0". The SDS is the same size as the CQB Compact and while having better accuracy than the CQB. There are a couple of better parts on the SDS, but nothing to account for a $1000 difference. My guess is that you are paying for a lot more time of parts being hand fit together. This is something that you can't see usually, but is costly and if done right will make the gun much better.

If you saw the feature on Vicker's .45s that now cost something like four grand and have a three or four year weight, he uses the gun the customer supplies and then changes out various parts and hand fits everything, adds a few new parts like an extended mag well and sights, and parkerizes the gun. None of the parts on the gun constitute the price fetched by Vicker's guns. He uses good parts, but nothing terribly space-aged or extraordinary. In many respects, his guns don't appear to be anything terribly special other than being a well made gun. The cost comes with all the hand fitting he does.

I have a CQB Compact. I think it is a fine shooting gun. I have a full-sized CQB. It shoots really nice as well. For my shooting skills, the difference in their accuracy means nothing to me. At 25 yards, I have yet to manage to shoot a 6" group with five shots, hand held, with either or any pistol. So I can't shoot to the abilities of the guns at distance and so the trivial 1/2" isn't of consequence to me.

I would go with the CQB unless someone can give you a really good reason for the extra grand of cost.

Something to consider, the SDS has a full length guide rod that helps add a little muzzle end weight to the heavy cone barrel. You might consider adding that to the CQB to help with muzzle flip, but the steel CQB compact really doesn't feel that much different than a full-sized CQB in recoil.
 

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Double Naught

I agree that custom guns are expensive and you will pay for the labor intensive hand fitting. Whether it is worth it is up to the buyer.

I have a full size CQB and replaced the plastic guide rod with a FLGR and shock buff. I also have a full house Clark done on a Kimber Stainless Classic. I will admit that I can't tell the difference between the two at the range. All I know is I love them both. I am presently thinking of having a custom built on an early TRP. Just have not settled on a smith. Ain't tinkering with 1911's fun.
 

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Tinkering is great, but what I find works best is me making the decisions and letting somebody competent actually do the work! I have also gone to the FLGR on my full-size CQB and have now changed that to the heavier tungsten FLGR. The gun handles a little better for follow-up shots due to the extra muzzle weight. I let a friend shoot it and he thought I had loaded the gun with less than full power loads. I had not. For the inexperienced shooter, however, the extra muzzle weight made annoying anticipatory muzzle dips even worse.

So that is about the limit of my tinkering skills, drop in parts.
 
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