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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a newbie to shooting, and most definitely to 1911s. A friend of mine introduced me to an old USGI model this evening, and it was fascinating to see everything work exactly the way I had read about it.

When I dropped the slide on a fresh mag, however, he told me that using the thumb-operated slide release would wear on the slide. So instead I just pulled the slide back and dropped it from behind.

So is that true about the slide release? Which way is the correct way?
 

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Welcome!!!

Your friend is NOT correct. Using the slide stop to drop the slide from lock is not only perfectly acceptable, but it is the best way to do it with a 1911.

A lot of trainers will tell you to slingshot the slide, simply because this is a gross motor skill that will not go away under stress, and the technique works for all semi-autos. If you use the 1911 exclusively, there is NOTHING wrong with releasing the slide using the slide stop. This method makes better tactical and ergonomic sense anyway. As you seat the new mag with your support hand, note that your support hand thumb is already in perfect position to release the slide with the slide stop. You are almost in a good two-hand hold anyway at this point - why would you bring the support hand back up over the slide to slingshot? Drop the slide with your thumb, assume your two hand hold and start blasting!
 

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The way to go is to use the slide stop. It is substantially faster if you worry about defensive handgunning.

I have always been taught to use the firing side thumb to drop the slide stop if you can easily reach it. You have already canted the gun to drop the magazine so you should be able to reach it. The second choice (the one I use) is to drop it with the support side thumb. If you miss it, you may might then use your support side hand to rack the slide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, you folks are awesome! Thanks for the speedy replies.

I've been a big fan of the 1911 for a looong time, after having read its history and admired the custom work for so long, but I'd never had the chance to actually shoot one until the other night.

Using the slide release felt absolutely natural to me, and everything was easily within reach, even though it was bone stock.

If I ever get the chance again I'll still do it his way, as it's his pistola. But once I've saved up a bit, I think I'll be doing it my way on mine. :grin:

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: DDS on 2001-06-02 02:12 ]</font>
 

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well, i am going to RESPECTFULLY disagree, in my opinion using the slide release will mess up the slot in the slide for the slide stop, it is caused by the downward motion of the stop and the forward motion caused by the recoil spring of the gun eventually this will round the back corner of the stop slot, the way i rack the slide is not actually a "slingshot" action either, i put the heel of the left hand on the slide about where the serrations are and fingers go over the top and grip slide and with one quick motion rearward gun is ready.
the way I see it is you do your guns your way, and i'll do your guns your way , but please do my guns my guns my way.
 

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Hey, DDS:
Welcome aboard. I think you'll find this site fascinating and very thought provoking. NOW GET YOURSELF A 1911!

At any rate, I think Shane said it all very well. (Hint: that's why it's called a 'slide release' :wink: ). Military teaches the use of the left hand thumb to drop the slide, for just the reasons Shane has stated. When a B.G. is on my a$$, the last thing I'm gonna worry about is dinging my slide!
 

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A lot of trainers will tell you to slingshot the slide, simply because this is a gross motor skill that will not go away under stress, and the technique works for all semi-autos.
Thank you Shane for the quote :grin: There is another thread addressing this issue on the board if anyone else knows where it is?

The "lot of trainers" quote is true only in the fact that so many believe such out dated material. The fact is Mas Ayoob actually took the time to do some serious scientific testing with adreneline and shooters under controlled circumstances which revealed, to no ones surprise really, that the sling shot is actually a more difficult skill to accomplish under stress that dropping the slide release on a 1911. The other fallacy is that a sling shot works on every semi auto. It doesn't. Kimbers and Wilson's being a good example if they have a buff installed.

There is NO WEAR on a quality 1911 from dropping the slide with the slide release with a mag inserted and ammo available.
 

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it is almost automatic when you use the weak hand thumb after pushing the new mag in. the sling shot technique is just another thing to do after the fresh mag is inserted and takes longer to get back on target.
 

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Anyone ever worn out a slide release or the notch on the slide? Didn't think so. Using the same logic that you will wear out the notch, at the most, you will use your slide release once every 8 rounds. Your slide will wear out much quicker since it's moving 8 times for every one.
 

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On 2001-06-03 14:48, Dane Burns wrote:

The "lot of trainers" quote is true only in the fact that so many believe such out dated material. The fact is Mas Ayoob actually took the time to do some serious scientific testing with adreneline and shooters under controlled circumstances which revealed, to no ones surprise really, that the sling shot is actually a more difficult skill to accomplish under stress that dropping the slide release on a 1911ammo available.
Absolutely.
 

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since everyone here disagreed with me i will give the one "for instance" i know. i have a friend with a colt delta elite who always uses the slide stop or release(which ever you want to call it) and the back edge of the stop slot in the slide is rounded off and burred up. i attributed this to his constant use of the stop/release. anyone else with an opinion please prove me right or wrong to this occurance. Dane what do you think is the reason for this?
 

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The 9x23s will do the same with full power loads on some slides. I suspect it is the slide velocity when the slide stop pops up. No question either can have wear. But it is the power of the rounds and recoil springs compared to a 45 I suspect.
 
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""since everyone here disagreed with me i will give the one "for instance" i know. i have a friend with a colt delta elite who always uses the slide stop or release(which ever you want to call it) and the back edge of the stop slot in the slide is rounded off and burred up. i attributed this to his constant use of the stop/release. anyone else with an opinion please prove me right or wrong to this occurance. Dane what do you think is the reason for this? ""

I'd wager weak mag springs... sounds as if the follower is only lifting the slide stop partially into the path of the slide, causing the dings, burrs, and rounding...

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Arrowman on 2001-06-10 20:18 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Arrowman on 2001-06-10 20:19 ]</font>
 
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