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I learned (many years ago) to place my support hand thumb over my strong hand thumb atop the slide safety. This has worked for me, but I see most of the modern shooters placing the thumb along the slide.
Am I missing something? Is there a definite advantage to having your thumb along the slide? It would be a definite challenge to try to break years of practice, but if there is a REAL advantage I may have to try.
Please let me know your opinions.
 

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The grip you use makes for a weaker grip. Try this test, make a fist with your thumb sticking straight up. Now try making a fist with your thumb bent down. Do you feel an increase in grip strength? I do.

I don't think it makes a bit of difference performance wise though. I've seen some great shooters, such as Jeff Cooper and Tom Givens, use the same grip that you currently use. The grip you describe is part of the Modern Technique. I would use whatever is most comfortable for you.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: JM on 2001-07-02 14:17 ]</font>
 

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The "Thumbs fwd." grip was popularized by Brin Enos I believe?
http://www.brianenos.com/pages/home.html

Switched from thumbs down and never went back. Think it is a superior grip.
Might find this interesting:

http://www.mattburkett.com/1.html
_________________
"Cogito, ergo armo"



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Pistolero on 2001-07-02 17:19 ]</font>
 

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[q]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I learned (many years ago) to place my support hand thumb over my strong hand thumb atop the slide safety. This has worked for me, but I see most of the modern shooters placing the thumb along the slide.
Am I missing something? Is there a definite advantage to having your thumb along the slide? It would be a definite challenge to try to break years of practice, but if there is a REAL advantage I may have to try.
Please let me know your opinions.
[/q]

There's always some of us that don't get the word :smile: You can count me in that group also. I do all sorts of stuff that the competitive gurus disdain.

The argument of course is that you get a bigger "footprint" (handprint?) on the weak side stock. The Counter is that the opposoble thumb actually has more gripping power against the fingers than the straight forward and it helps to insure you won't inadvertently flip on the thumb safety.

Who's right? I have no idea but I figure it is an individual thing since most of these guys are shooting borderline power factors or comped guns it probably doesn't matter. Use what works for you.

Cordially,
Jim Higginbotham
 

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Tried the "thumb on slide " hold, with left index finger on the front of the trigger guard, as well off and wrapped around the strong hand.

Although I liked it for 1911`s and found it rock solid as well as greatly helping accuracy, I sometimes ended up with the thumb near or on the slide stop, which sooner or later caused the slide to fail to lock back on an empty Mag. which is IMO a bad thing.

If you can avoid this it may be the best hold
in use for combat/competition.
 

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I've always used the thumbs forward grip because it allows the base of the support thumb to smoothly fit in the curve between the heel & the base of the primary hand. This leaves virtually no "gap" and provides a more solid grip IMO. It also provides an index, the slide stop, for the support thumb. On the other hand, if it would let me shoot like Jim H, I'd be more than willing to use the inverted, reverse pretzel grip.
 

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On 2001-07-02 22:31, Blackjack wrote:
Tried the "thumb on slide " hold, with left index finger on the front of the trigger guard, as well off and wrapped around the strong hand.

Although I liked it for 1911`s and found it rock solid as well as greatly helping accuracy, I sometimes ended up with the thumb near or on the slide stop, which sooner or later caused the slide to fail to lock back on an empty Mag. which is IMO a bad thing.

If you can avoid this it may be the best hold
in use for combat/competition.
Exact same problem I've had trying this grip style.
 

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I sometimes ended up with the thumb near or on the slide stop, which sooner or later caused the slide to fail to lock back
Helps to realise that the goal is shooting in IPSC or self defense for that matter. The first load in the gun for self defense should solve the problem. There are many Masters and GMs who modify their match and personal defense guns so that they won't lock back which will prevent a premature lock back while under stress....for ANY reason.

The thumbs are used as a physical index and "point" at the target. It is a very good grip for the intended purpose...putting rounds on target quickly.

Like the all of techniques it has a plus and a minus.
 

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As an addendum to the problem with slide lock back. I also had inadvertantly knocked the slide lock up in the middle of a string of shots and locked the slide back prematurely.
 
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