Pistol Smith Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading the great posts from Hilton, prvt Ryan, and so many others, I
couldn't leave well enough alone.

I fit a new brown fp stop, which was totally painless -- a little filing on the
right side, and then a bit to clear the ejector. I slightly rounded, polished
and tensioned a new Brown extractor (still not sure about the tension, but
I'll test fire it on Friday night), and installed a Brown safety -- following
one of the threads here and a borrowed copy of the Kunhausen book. All that
was easier than I thought. OH, yeah, I replaced the plunger tube spring as
well. The safety is nice and positive...snick, snick.

Next, I had a wild hair to bob/reshape/dehorn the gi hammer that came on the
pistol. I could have just replaced it with the ubiquitous commander style. I
just wanted something different, and I wanted to do it myself. I just cut a
couple of serrations off the back with a hack-saw, and cleaned it up with a
fine file and a couple of stones. I used a soak-in-water slip stone to clean
up the back side. I broke the sharp edges with sandpaper wrapped around a pink
eraser. It actually looks better in person. The bluing is just some cold blue
rubbed on it before I'm going to bed (I know it is blotchy and crappy).

I also polished the breech face, with some 600 grit wrapped around an old
small file, and polished the recoil spring guide rod, which was *really*
rough.

What's next? I had a trigger job done on this pistol about 8 years ago, but
the trigger is the stock gi part. I'm going to install a Nowlin trigger, when
it gets here.

Sorry about the poor quality photo.





<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Kenneth Bowen on 2001-11-15 03:44 ]</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
I've been working on a project gun for almost a year. I had originally contacted Dane about building it, but money (why is it always money?) became a problem, so I've been working on it, paycheck to paycheck, myself.
Polishing the disconnector track is easy, and allows the gun to cycle smoother. Likewise, polishing the inside of the mainspring housing makes for smoother cocking and cycling. When you install the new trigger, be sure to polish the ways in the frame in which the trigger rides. All of that stuff can be done without having to do any refinishing. I've had good results with Marvel oversize hammer and sear pins. You need the proper reamers to use them, but they ensure there's no wobble in the hammer and sear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
I like it...You did a good job and I can't really say anything bad about the photo or the blue either....You should see mine!!! Hang in....Havin' fun is a big part of it too...Congrats!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Kenneth:
Looks cool. I did a similar bob on my Gold Cup way back in the 80's. I like the cosmetics of this mod.

You'll find extractor tension to be fairly forgiving. I found that using the Weigand gauges, while a more expensive route than "that magic feel", has been helpful. In fact, it helps develop a good "feel" for the right tension quickly by giving you a way to measure what you feel by sliding rounds under the extractor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Kenneth,

Looks pretty good to me! I like it alot better than the stock spur. I finally got up the nerve to start tinkering with one of mine as well. Is it just me or does the pucker-factor drastically increase right before you take a file to a perfectly good weapon?

Waldo1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I like the bobbed hammer, getting tired of all those elongated hole "tactical" jobs. Been along time since I shot a 1911 without a beaver safety, does anyone find this to be a real important mod? Does it really help the way the gun shoots or comfort?

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
On 2001-11-29 20:51, EJR wrote:
I like the bobbed hammer, getting tired of all those elongated hole "tactical" jobs. Been along time since I shot a 1911 without a beaver safety, does anyone find this to be a real important mod? Does it really help the way the gun shoots or comfort?

Ed
May very well depend on the hand size. I have smaller hands, and have absolutely no problem with hammer bite when shooting my original Colt 1911 (mfr.date of 1914), and a current production SA mil-spec version.

_________________
Regards,
AZFred

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Fred on 2001-11-30 12:24 ]</font>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
I have found that I can't really tell if a gun has a beavertail or not, as long as the frame tangs and grip safety are not sharp. When I saw the Gunsite Gunsmithy "Cooper 80" pistol, with the grip safety tang cut completely off and blended with the frame, I thought, "Yeah, that's it!" I did have to cut a few serrations off the hammer, but nothing drastic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I find the early 1911 short tangs good to use. I too don't have much problem with hammer bite. It is also a help in my working with the "thumb over safety" grip with I cannot do and maintain with a beavertail (even with a "memory hump").
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top