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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had the pleasure of being a tester of this new innovation from BCP. Dane sent me the gun and as soon as I took it out of the box it just felt good in my hand. The gun itself is an awesome piece of equipment and everything on it is just perfect. The wave patern is on the MSH and front strap.

When you tighten your grip hard around the gun it HURTS. I would rate it between 20 lpi and 30 lpi checkering as far as grip and this is after Dane softened it up. I have to say, pictures do not do this wave justice due to the 2D effect. It is much more pleasing to the eye in 3D.

I went to the range to do some out of the holster work with 300 rounds. The gun was oily (frame is still in the white and unfinished) but I did not to wipe it off. I wanted to give the new texture a real test. I started with slow draws so that I won’t drop this oily gun and have Dane come after me with his Dobermans J I was surprised at how well this texture griped my hand even with the oil! When you draw the gun and shoot it doesn’t feel like a wave or checkering it feels like a Dirt bike grip that just glues to your hand. It is hard to explain but once you tighten the hand around it, it won’t budge. All you have to do is let off pressure with the hand and it becomes slippery enough like a smooth strap to move around in the hand for mag change or grip adjustment from a bad draw (I had a lot of bad draws today breaking the 1 second).

Another thing I like about it is that it is a rough texture, seemingly it would be uneffected by hard use and abuse, unlike checkering that can get banged up.

To sum it up, I like this thing so much I am sending Dane my kimber 40 to do a "Fed Wave 10" package on it. I think writing a check is the strongest endorsement of a product. Talk is cheap.

Regards,

Shay
 

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Same gun with the frame in the "white" that Shay was shooting. Appreciate the comments, Bro, thanks! :grin:







<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Dane Burns on 2001-07-20 02:02 ]</font>
 

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Looks and sounds like a very cool innovation, Dane. Not much shows up these days that's both new and positively impacts handling. This seems to fit the bill on both counts. Very creative.

My compliments to the chef....
 

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Shay... You could have saved shipping by sending it here :wink: I'd have gladly performed more testing, and shipped it along... Hell... Rick probably would have been all fired up to help too :wink:

Dane... How come you never send stuff to me to 'Beta Test' :sad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On 2001-07-20 01:45, Louis F. Alessi wrote:
Shay, You should have sent just the slide, and held the frame for ransom!
Lou
Danes no sucker, when he sent the gun he made sure to remind me that 3 of my guns are in his shop :smile: if he didn't have my guns I would have kept the wave for some long term T&E.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I posted this on TFL and a question came up as to why I thought this was better then regular serrations. Good point.

IMO The better grip is due to the width of the cut, there is more room for the flesh to be pushed in and the corners of each groove are what grabs the skin.
 

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There is good solid reasoning and some very subtle nuances in this particular design. You really have to think in 3D to understand whats actually going on.

Hint: imagine whats going on in an S pattern that is cut on a radius. Think of what happens to the relationship of the groove edges to each other as they proceed around the curve. Also, think about what is going on for each side of the S. Now ralize that streight serrations dont even have a horizontal component to them. This should give you some ideas to toy with.

Shay,

You are almost there, but its more in the subtlties of the changing groove profile that give the godawful gripping power.



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if it flies it dies, if it runs it's done

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: peter zahn on 2001-07-21 20:38 ]</font>
 

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Peter has the details down :grin: Don't ya ! What is missed by some and I have nowhere near the full story, is that typical serrations are cut with a V shaped cutter, the wave is not. Serrations run vertically. The wave makes a , well, wave. Which means that it grips on the vertical, horizontal and everywhere inbetween. Surprizingly so. The difference between the V cutter and the way the WAVE is done with the space between them, the depth of the cut and the continual changing profile of the groove makes the WAVE much more than it first appears.

I'm not the genius that came up with this idea. I just know the right guys to work with and how to tweek it a bit for better performance on the end use :grin:

No matter they DO work :wink:
 

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Well instead of teasing I might as well tell you all about the profile and what is happening. YOu can draw your own conclusions. But at least this way there will be no misconceptions about what is going on.

The cutter has a width x, say 1/16". The pictures clearly show what kind of cutter is used as the profile of the groove is not a V.

Ok, here comes the really neat stuff. Hold the gun with the magazine opening looking at you. You should see the frontstrap radius in profile. You see it go around the grip in a nice even radius. Now make note that if you look at the centerline of the gun for every 1/16" left or right of the centerline the radius drops down, continuing till it is blended into the sides of the gun. This is critical in understanding the WAVE. If you were now to cut this groove streight, not curved as the WAVE is down the middle of the frontstrap, the height of the groove edges would be the same height. All makes sence so far, right? Well, now imagine cutting the WAVE. The WAVE veers off of centerline by amount X and is 1/16 wide adding even more distance from centerline. This in effect changes the groove edge height relationship. The edge of the groove closest to the centerline will be higher than the outer groove edge. The only time they are the same height is when the groove crosses over the centerline. This creates a ledge or step at the inner groove edge that faces outward. Even more interesting, since the WAVE veers off of centerline in both directions during one of the S shapes, each S has 2 of these ledges facing in opposite directions giving control in both directions. It is not much of a ledge, perhaps only a 4 to 7 thousands, but that is plenty to give a good gripping action. Now, look at all the WAVES and consider how many lateral gripping control points you are dealing with. This is the essence of the left to right control issues.

As for the vertical gripping power. The WAVE meanders back and forth left to right in a very lazy way. All these turns create a horizontal component which when added up give a significant resistance to gun slippage in the vertical direction. But that isn't all thats going on. Remember that ledge? It also comes into play in the vertical direction as well, more subtlely to be sure, but it is still there.

The groove width plays a critical part as well, as Shay intuitively realized. More of your meat gets in the grooves.

The reason Dane must soften up the WAVE after being cut is for the most part due to the ledges acting like razor blades. I'm sure if he didnt do this, your hand would look like hamburger after a couple hundred rounds. Maybe a good test for grip slippage control under bloody conditions, but not anything any of you guys would volunteer to test.

It's not at all surprising that with so many control points that so few grooves can give so good a grip. It would probably be a detriment to have more grooves as the flats remaining would be smaller, probably creating problems if you have to shift the gun a bit for position.

Well there you go, thats my take on this WAVE thing. Any Questions?

PS, Im not responsible for typos, so just fagedabaded

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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: peter zahn on 2001-07-22 11:25 ]</font>
 

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Bottom line? The "WAVE" has no real reference to serrations nor does it resemble the minimal performance of serrations.

Add the gripping effect of the "WAVE" to the fact that it is much easier to "release" the grip and have the gun act like a smooth front strap adds an incredible amount of versatility. More useful in a varity of circumstances than any other texture I have shot on a 1911.

Thanks Peter for the technical explanation. Thanks even more for helping me bring this process to my customers.
 
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