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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for some advice on which new pistol to purchase. I know, everyone and their dog posts a similar question, but I've done LOTS of searches and haven't come up with a good answer to my specific situation. Any and all input is greatly appreciated.
I'm looking for a pistol for, in order of prioroity, 1. Home defense 2. Range use/fun 3. Wife can shoot this pistol as well 4. (low on the list) potential carry weapon once I leave this state. 5. potential IDPA pistol. Above all the pistol must be out of the box reliable as heck!

Though I love 1911's, the look, feel in my hand bar none, balance, potential for a carry pistol in a compact or commander size, and options for a lower maintanance SS finish, I'm concerned about the 1. out of box reliabilty, 2. high initial cost for a good 1911, and 3. High ammo cost (relative to 9mm), as I don't reload and don't plan to reload (I don't have a lot of extra time on my hands, and what I do have, I want to spend shooting).

The 9mms I'm considering are the BHP (love the feel, balance, and pointability, as well as a SA trigger). The downside is increasing cost of the MK IIIs and difficulty in finding one in my state (hard to ship to as well due to new laws). Also I'm not sure how much smithing needs to be done to make this thing -reliable- to the hilt.

The other 9mms are the CZ's, both the full size 75 and the PCR. Advantage full size: 15 round mags for cheap, inexpensive initial cost, built like a tank, great out of box reliability, good grip, and aftermarket accessories (grips, sights). I don't particularly care for the feel of the safety lever (relative to a BHP or 1911), and it's bulkier than a 1911, definately not concealable (though see 4. above).

Advantage PCR: lighter, smaller, good potential carry pistol, tacky as heck grip with the rubber/serrations. Downside: the funky novakish sight (should have milled from the dovetail BACK to mate evenly with the frame edge (I know, picky picky)). Also a downside is probs I've heard with the castrated (10rd) mag, and inavalibility of full cap mags. Also downside is a potential wearing out of the alloy frame over time?

As far as the other brands, incliding SIG, HK, S&W, Ruger, Glock, none of them fit my hand well or have acceptable triggers (for one reason or another). I love slim grips, which is why these keep calling to me.

So, with all of that in consideration, what would y'all suggest or buy yourself?? 1911, ammo costs be damned? The sleek and stylish classic P35? A durable larger CZ75B, or the compact alloy PCR? Anything important I'm not looking at? THANK YOU SO MUCH IN ADVANCE!

Cedric
 

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Given the criteria of 9x19mm chambering and a single action trigger, I'd have a slight preference for the CZ-75B over the Hi-Power. That might change if I could find a Hi-Power that had a good trigger in spite of the magazine "safety".

BTW, I think "out of the box" reliability is over-rated unless you're planning to get in a gunfight on your way home from the gun shop. :grin: I'd rather have a $350 pistol that ran 100% after a little break-in and tweaking than than a $550 pistol that was totally reliable from the factory.
 

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Hmm, I'd probably be inclined toward the BHP. I have one in .40 that went more than 10k rounds without any kind of failure to feed, fire or extract. Broke the extractor claw at a little over 10k, and once that was replaced it went back to its incredible reliability. The BHP "points" better than any gun I've ever held -- just an amazingly natural draw to sight alignment without really even thinking about it. In 9mm, it's pretty soft shooting. Mine is my primary IDPA gun as well as being my daily carry piece when I lived in a state that allowed carry.

And just to be heretical . . . the Smith & Wesson 3913TSW is a great gun right out of the box, too. The TSW (Tactical version) comes with most of the mods that you'd have a gunsmith do, like Novak sights, barrel throating, etc. I bought one for my wife because it's so thin and fits her hands perfectly. I like it a lot as well. I surprised myself by cleaning the extremely tough Air Marshall's qualification course with it during a class a year or so ago. Conceals well, shoots well and is a DA, so my wife feels safer with it than she does a SA pistol. Purchased it for right at $500.

Chad
 

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Definantly the Browning High Power. I carried a HP for about 10yrs. It was always reliable,accurate,fairly powerful and relitivly inexpensive to shoot. Were it not for my current infatuation with large caliber single action revolvers I would still be carring it. Another plus...You can still purchase 13rd magazines for a decent price,due to its being a former military weapon. Go with the High Power.....
 
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Given your concerns and criterion go with the high power, if I could suggest the practical model as it offers good sights and a durable finish for when you do carry it.
One other advantage longetivity wise over the length of ownership of the pistol is that the serial number is not on the front strap so when you eventually have a smith stipple or checker it they do not have the hassles for moving the serial#.
9mm is a fine choice for a defensive gun, practice with it, use good quality JHP ammo of your choice and plan to use multiple rounds with accurate shot placement. You can practice/reinforce this plan through quality practice time. 9mm ammo is dirt cheap so you will be able to practice frequently wihtout injuries to your budget. Also Pre ban High Power mags are amazingly plentiful and cheap.
 

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Gotta say Hi Power It is a new infatuation with me just bought my 1st a couple of months ago. I have about 800 rds through it now with out so much as a hiccup , but you might try to rent one at a range to make sure you do not get bitten by the hammer. I now have 2 an early 40s FN that will bite big time and a 95 Std that has no bite at all. On the matter of the CZ , the CZ75SA is very accurate to shoot and the safety will grow on you if you use the high hold grip its very hard to drag your thumb on the CZ slide . But I am not fond of the sights
Gerald
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input folks!

I can see the strong BHP following here. I've only gotten to hold one, a rather beaten pistol. My hand fills the grip (I'm a thin 6'3" with decent size hands. :smile:

The ranges here, unfortunately, don't have BHPs, 1911s, or CZs for rent. :sad:

I agree on the CZ sights. They're OK, but the green paint has to go, and I may consider more visable sights in the future (Mr. Camp, how's that CZ coming along??)

I like nicely visable 3 dots, and whatever pistol I get may get upgraded quickly in that fashion.

I also must admit that I'm quite taken by the appearance of some of the custom BHPs here, my God custom low mount sights and rosewood grips look sexy on that pistol. :smile:

As far as my "out of box reliability" comment, I meant a pistol with breaking in, which is 100% (or as close as possible) reliable. I don't want to be forced into a lot of custom work just to get reliability out of a $400 to $800 pistol. It seems to me that for that much money, they'd be reliable to start with.

Cedric
 

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I think the out of the box reliability of either a Hi-Power or CZ 75 variant are really outstanding. I traded a Glock 34 off to aquire the last Browning , and it and the CZ so far have been as reliable. I have about 1200 rds through the CZ in 40 S&W and have had 1 ftf in the 1st magazine and I cant think of any more.
Good Luck
Gerald
 
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I will answer the question about Novak sights on a CZ75. Do they work? Yes, they are the difference between night and day on my CZ75. It took about a month to have them installed by Novak's 45 Shop; the sights had to be sent out for Trijicon inserts after the slide was finished. Were my sights cheap? No, the total cost was $300. Am I satisfied with the sights and service? Definitely. Regards, Richard
 

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If your wife is going to shoot it, you are better-off going with a revolver.

The revolver is much easier to learn to operate safely. (How do I load and unload this thing?) Many have trouble racking the slide, loading the magazines, and remembering what all those buttons and levers do!

Many gun owners do not practice regularly. I believe that the simplicity of the revolver is better for the person who is not dedicated.

Your wife must be comfortable with the handgun. It may be best if your wife selects the gun with no pressure from you or the gunshop employees.

You can adapt to whatever quality handgun that she chooses.

Good luck in finding the perfect handgun for your wife (and you).

-Mk.IV
 
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