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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found this great link to an article written by Armed Forces Journal on RBCD. VERY INTERESTING!

http://www.afji.com/AFJI/Mags/2001/Augu ... rRound.htm



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: etherfac on 2001-09-11 02:10 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: etherfac on 2001-09-11 02:19 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: etherfac on 2001-09-11 04:07 ]</font>
 

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The only obstacle in my view is that, despite their assurances, I cannot see what would keep this bullet from (prematurely) disintergrating against say, an heavy leather jacket or like, dense garment. Still, I would like to believe.
 

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From the "'Meteor' Round" article:
Tests of the unique ammunition have demonstrated that when a BMT round strikes soft tissue in a chest cavity, the resulting hydrostatic shock is so severe it destroys brain tissue mass, Bulmer said. As a result, a heart or lung shot against a large animal, such as a deer (and, presumably, a human), consistently causes the animal to drop the instant it’s struck. (After receiving a fatal shot to the chest from standard ammunition types, a deer’s reflexes often propel the animal a short distance after being struck.)
It appears Mr. Stan Bulmer, vice president for domestic sales (law enforcement & military) for Le Mas Ltd. -- the exclusive distributor for RBCD ammo -- is another bullet salesman who doesn't know what he's talking about, with regard to his absurd claims about the effects on brain tissue by hydrostatic shock produced in the torso by RBCD bullets.

I have not tested RBCD ammunition, nor am I aware of any reliable source who's tested it, and thus I have not made a determination about its suitability for personal defense use.

However, I do not regard highly any ammo manufacturer or distributor that tests personal defense ammunition in clay. Clay exaggerates wounding potential and does not accurately represent wounding effects of bullets shot into it. RBCD has a habit of using clay, instead of properly prepared ordnance gelatin, to demonstrate the wounding characteristics of its ammunition. Why do you think RBCD and LeMas use clay blocks to demonstrate 'wounding effects' of RBCD bullets?

One need only look at the photo of the clay block of the ".40 S&W truncated ball" in the first "defensive" photo and see for oneself the extent of exaggeration that clay exhibits. The hole produced in the clay block is 3-4 inches in diameter, which greatly exceeds the damage produced in human tissue.

The use of unusual terminology, "truncated ball," should set off BS alarms with regard to the professionalism of the people who are marketing this ammo.
 
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I would tend to agree with Shawn but with the velocities this ammo is claimed to achieve even if it completely failed to fragment or expand it would remain highly unlikely that this ammo will have a low wounding factor/potential.

As to the use of plastics and composite metals the idea is sound, I remember some years back reading the development papers for the space shuttle ceramic plating system when a mass acceleration system was used to propel composite disks at velocities up to and over 25,000 fps.
The initial tests revealed serious flaws in the initial armoring concepts as the 20gr disk was able to penetrate over 10" of hardened armor plate.
The mass accelerator became the basis for several weapons ideas; I recall that in one test the disk was able to pass through over 100 layers of Kevlar composites and four frozen steer cadavers before completely disintegrating.

I have not tested this ammo and it remains unseen if RBCD lives up to the claims it is interesting and worth examining.
 
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