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Definitely the sights! Those plastic things are garbage. I also replaced the captive recoil spring set-up with a Wolff FLGR and spring. The only other change I made was to put in a lighter striker spring.

(I also own a 17 - although my wife has kinda taking a liking to it - she shoots it better than me anyway... :wink: )
 

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I second Shane's comments. Just replaced the sights and spring system on my Glock 30 with Heinie Straight Eight night sights and a Wolff guide rod/spring set up. I am very satified with this set up.
Bill Go

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Bill Go on 2001-06-23 23:06 ]</font>
 

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There are only 3 items can think of that need R/R on a "new" Glock, sights, Sights & SIGHTS! Novak's or Heinie's improve things markedly.
 

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I feel that it depends n the person behind the gun as to what needs to be replaced...I have been shooting thirty years...the one lession to be learned is that no two shooters are the same...with respect to their requirements.

I feel that the factory sights are good.
Any thing added to a gun will have to be explained if the gun should have to be used in self defense.

That said...if I were to change anything I would go to the Heinie night sight.....

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: glh on 2001-06-24 12:29 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: glh on 2001-06-24 12:30 ]</font>
 

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On 2001-06-24 12:27, glh wrote:
I feel that the factory sights are good.
Any thing added to a gun will have to be explained if the gun should have to be used in self defense.
Welcome to the forum glh.

As far as your statement above, adding quality sights to any gun is EASILY explained. They allow you to shoot with more accuracy insuring that errant rounds don't end up where they shouldn't.
 

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If you are getting a G17 you won't need to relace the recoil spring. Most recommend against it.

In a G30 I think you can get away with it.

On sights...shoot it for a while with the factory fixed sights (not the adjustables). If you don't like the sights then get either Heinie's of Novak's.

If you are going to use it for JUST competitions then you can think about changing some minor trigger parts to give a better release.
 

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FWIW - I have the original, non-captive guide rod and recoil spring in my 1988 vintage G-17, and I just replaced the front sight because the epoxy had yellowed a bit.

I like that one just stock, but it has no finger grooves, and feels better in my hand than the new ones. JMHO
 

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On 2001-06-25 20:30, Flexmoney wrote:
Shane,

I am interested in why you would want to change it.
I simply do not like the flimsy plastic guide rod that the G17's (newer finger groove/accessory rail style) came with. The plastic guide rod end that seats into the barrel "half-moon" cut-out, can get severely worn, to the point that it will no longer stay seated properly in position.

I'm just curious as to who recommended against replacing this, and why.

There is no harm in adding a metal guide rod, and it allows you the option of changing recoil springs to fine tune your set-up. Also makes routine recoil spring changes much easier every 2000-3000 rds.
 

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Shane,

I can't give you an exact source. I read way to many post on many different forums.

The "meat" of it is that some replacemnt rods and springs cause failures. I think the biggest part of it is that most are not flat-wound like the original Glock and ISMI springs are. The coil of the non-flat wound springs can overlap and bind up.

That being said...Your setup, from Wolff, seems to get very good feedback for reliability. Folks don't like putting them back in after taking the gun down though.

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I'm sleepy. Going to cut this short.

For a new shooter, I see no need to replace the factory Glock rod and spring. Lord knows they have been tested to death. If one wishes to replace them, then go for a captured model from ISMI. It's just an easier fix. If you have been around the block forever and want to play around with spring weight then an un-captured rod with ISMI or Wolff springs is the ticket.

Maybe I'm lucky. I haven't chewed-up the end of any of my plastic rods yet. I too, at frist thought that would be a weak point. Maybe I am being too gentle with mine.
 

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Shane,

I can't give you an exact source. I read way to many post on many different forums.

The "meat" of it is that some replacemnt rods and springs cause failures. I think the biggest part of it is that most are not flat-wound like the original Glock and ISMI springs are. The coil of the non-flat wound springs can overlap and bind up.

That being said...Your setup, from Wolff, seems to get very good feedback for reliability. Folks don't like putting them back in after taking the gun down though.

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I'm sleepy. Going to cut this short.

For a new shooter, I see no need to replace the factory Glock rod and spring. Lord knows they have been tested to death. If one wishes to replace them, then go for a captured model from ISMI. It's just an easier fix. If you have been around the block forever and want to play around with spring weight then an un-captured rod with ISMI or Wolff springs is the ticket.

Maybe I'm lucky. I haven't chewed-up the end of any of my plastic rods yet. I too, at frist thought that would be a weak point. Maybe I am being too gentle with mine.
 

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There is no harm in adding a metal guide rod, and it allows you the option of changing recoil springs to fine tune your set-up. Also makes routine recoil spring changes much easier every 2000-3000 rds.
A complete recoil spring assembly (spring + guide rod) from Glock costs about the same as a Wolff recoil spring alone. I'd say that yanking the whole assembly out and replacing it is about as easy as spring replacement gets. :smile:
 

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Unlike alot of handguns out there, the vast majority of the time with the Glock you don't *need* to replace anything for it to function out of the box. The stock sights do suck, I think the Heinie Slant-Pro are the best Glock sights going (and I've tried a bunch). The plastic guide rods hardly ever fail, but when is the last time you heard of a steel guide rod breaking? My Glock 20C has a captured stainless guide rod with the stock Glock recoil spring from Glockmeister.

http://www.glockmeister.com/springs.html

Other than that, I'd suggest getting some pre-ban magazines and alot of ammo before you consider anything else.
 

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I did some research on this on GT, and Ben(of Glockmeister) was the final word. I replaced my guide rod with a steel non-captured one. Reason? They can, and DO, break or wear down enough to tie up the gun. This has nothing to do with wear, or the age of the gun. When the guns were first imported here, they HAD steel rods. After determining the plastic ones were 'basically' functional, and certainly cheaper to produce, the change was made.

My only regret is not buying a captured rod. Even with the stock spring, it can be a BEAR to install back into place after cleaning.

That, and metal sights of your choice would be the only 'must haves', IMHO.
 

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The main thing is to get your gun setup the way you want and then to get lots and lots of range time with that setup.

Shoot the hell out of your gun and you will soon know what works for you.
 
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