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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was wondering how long I should leave my carry ammo in before changing it out? I've heard some say a couple months, I've heard some say a year. Just want to be positive it will go bang when I pull the trigger.
 
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Oddly enough I think we have all had the "old" circa 1950s surplus BI Ball .45acp "green" aged ammo that we shot up in practice.

It still works as a testament to good storage practices but I doubt that modern ammo with sealed primers that is not exposed to solvents or oils will actually go bad any time soon if it is kept clean and dry.

As a matter of practice I would change the ammo at each cleaning or at a minimum of every three months if you are trying to keep your costs down.

On the other hand some of us replace the ammo each day when exposed to the elements, it really depends on your "driving conditions" so to speak and the quality of the ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I was thinking a few months would be fine, went for 4 months without changing. Not on purpose I just didnt think about it and it all functioned perfectly.

Not to mention its kept clean and dry.
 

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Doomist, I agree with David. If you are like most of us, you clean your weapons after each use. That means your carry ammo is resting near fresh solvents, gun oil, and grease you have used to clean the pistol. The vapors from those liquids can decrease the power factor produced by the powder in the bullet. Thus, you are increasing your risk to FTF or FTE.

Fare Ye Well My Friend,
Chasmuss
 

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On 2001-11-21 19:38, chasmuss wrote:
Doomist, I agree with David. If you are like most of us, you clean your weapons after each use. That means your carry ammo is resting near fresh solvents, gun oil, and grease you have used to clean the pistol. The vapors from those liquids can decrease the power factor produced by the powder in the bullet. Thus, you are increasing your risk to FTF or FTE.
You don't want to be firing "ammo under the influence" do you? :lol:

_________________
"Your aim in life is not worth anything if you don't pull the trigger."

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: tonerguy on 2001-11-21 21:31 ]</font>
 

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Tonerguy, Great Line! A perfect two word summarization with a double meaning. I vote that we incorporate your line into the "Rules of Handguns" as Rule #5.

Happy Thanksgivings To All, and Fare Ye Well My Friends,

Chasmuss
 

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Spackler4013, Good question and I don't know the answer. Nail Polish has been used for alot of things beside our lady friends fingernails. Before I would try that trick, I'd do alot of research. Nail Polish, and nail polish remover have a few similar chemicals we find in gunpowder solvents. Nail polish contains derivatives of Acetate, Nitrocellulose, and Formaldehyde. Additionally, remover contains the same thing plus alcohol.

If the chemical part checks out as OK, then my next question is, "Does nail polish leave any residual material in the barrel? Does the sudden increase in pressure during firing cause the polish to "laminate" itself to the barrel?

Good question Spackler4013! I can see why a person (like a foul weather hunter) would like to have a simple trick like nail polish to further protect his ammo from the elements.

Happy Thanksgiving & Fare Ye Well My Friend,

Chasmuss
 
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