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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for the newbie questions but can't find the answer on the search function.

Why do the major 1911 makers all have FLGR in there guns? I find it anoying, at best, that I'd have to have a tool or paper clip to take a pistol apart.

Also, why do they all have triggers with the three holes in them? Any big advantages or disadvantages over solid triggers?

Looking for a entry-mid level 1911 and after seeing two slides stops break on Colt's as well as frame cracks in the SS versions, I'm going with a SA or maybe Kimber.
 

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Single stack 1911 guns with a full length guide rod and a barrel bushing do not need the "paper clip" for take down. The guns with a bull barrel and a reverse guide plug are the ones that need the "paper clip" or similar tool. Much, much debate on the use of a FLGR. Perhaps a search of past threads is a good place to start on that. As far as trigger holes, I think it is usually an attempt to remove weight and mass from the trigger. Some do not like them because it is a possible place to become fouled with dirt or other objects and block trigger function. I see no problem with the trigger holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So the standard full size Kimber would not need a tool with the FLGR but the Ultra carry with the bull barrel would?

I'm not worried about the pro's and con's of FLGR, I've searched and made up my mind about what I want.

I was just curious about the trigger.
 

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The only drawback I see to the FLGR is the inability to rack the slide on the edge of the table to do a 1 hand reload or clearing.
The trigger hole are to lighten the trigger and they are available in solid form or two oval holes or a dozen other configs.
 

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The only real draw back I see to a FLGR is that I can't take my SA apart with out tools. Well okay, to be honest, I can get it apart, but I can't get it back together, unless someone knows a trick for keeping the barrel link exposed with the FLGR in under full pressure of the recoil spring.
 

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The SA that I own has a 2-piece FLGR which, as stated, needs a screwdriver or an allen wrench to take apart and reassemble. My Kimber has a one piece FLGR and the pistol can be completely disassembled and reassembled using no tools.

None of my pistols with the three hole trigger would be blocked from funtioning as a result of any debris or foreign object in the holes as the trigger only moves a fraction of an inch before firing.

-Hal
 

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charleym3
Here's the trick I use to assemble my 1911's with FLGR's. I assemble the slide in the normal manner allowing the recoil spring to extend from the front of the slide. I then mate the slide to the frame and insert the slide stop. After this I cock the gun and place the thumb safety on. Then I slide the recoil spring plug on and depress it with my thumb while at the same time turning the barrel bushing into position with my fingers.

If the barrel bushing is very tight I use the same precedure as above but turn the bushing with a bushing wrench. It sounds more complicated than it is.

Duke
Long live the 1911
 

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I'm with Duke for the one-piece FLGRs. To strip/assemble a non-bull-barrelled two-piece-FLGR pistol, you can lock the slide back and unscrew the front part of the guide rod with your fingers and thumb. Once it's apart, disassembly is normal. To assemble, screw the guide rod back together as the last step, with the slide fully forward to avoid binding of the spring against the threads.

I had a 2-piece on my first 1911; hated it purely due to the extra hassle. My Kimber has a 1-piece. I've been trying to decide if I want to replace it with a traditional recoil spring guide and plug; I guess I'm devolving...

As far as the holes in the trigger are concerned, I've only heard anecdotes of AD/NDs caused by reholstering while something was caught sticking out of one of the holes. While I suppose that's possible, that's what the thumb safety is for, though even that may not help if your luck and awareness are so bad as to get a small wire caught in the hole in the trigger, not notice, and re-holster your blaster...

I'd be just as happy with a solid trigger that wasn't heavy enough to bounce on a 4-5# trigger, as I really couldn't care less whether or not the holes are there. While I know we're supposed to limit the number of things that can go wrong as much as possible, I'm willing to take any associated risk, and I'll continue to buy lottery tickets. Once I win the lottery, I'll get more concerned about it.

[edit: Sorry for the book! :smile: ]

George



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: georgek on 2001-11-06 19:34 ]</font>
 

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On 2001-11-06 17:42, Duke wrote:
charleym3
Here's the trick I use to assemble my 1911's with FLGR's. I assemble the slide in the normal manner allowing the recoil spring to extend from the front of the slide. I then mate the slide to the frame and insert the slide stop. After this I cock the gun and place the thumb safety on. Then I slide the recoil spring plug on and depress it with my thumb while at the same time turning the barrel bushing into position with my fingers.

Duke
Long live the 1911
I though about only making it finger tight, but then I have to be constantly monitoring it to see if it's backing out. I thought about getting a slot milled in it the size of a quarter. Least then I could work it with poket change.
I spent the last 20 minutes trying to get it apart and back together as a unit. It ain't gonna work. When fully tightened, the rod is in front of the face of the slide, meaning that even if I get the plunger (with it's razor sharpe edge) pushed down far enough to turn the bushing, the rod will not allow the bushing to be turned. I just finsihed replacing it with a standard assembly. Phooy! I like the concept. If I never needed to take a gun apart on the range, I wouldn't worry about it, but Murphy will *not* be denied. Maybe I'll just locktite the two pieces together and grind it down far enough for the bushing to clear.
Thanks for the help and advice.
 

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Charley -

Your post describes exactly my progression/regression through the FLGR process. I wonder why they make the 2-piece units that long? I think that if the 2-piece guide rod didn't exist, there wouldn't be as many anecdotes about FLGR's being bad, as I haven't heard the masses of Kimber owners screaming about FLGR problems, and Kimbers all have them, but most (if not all) are 1-piece.

I decided against the grinding because I'd end up with the worst of both worlds when I was done: a solution to an arguably non-existent problem that also has the benefit of being more likely to break than either a standard recoil spring guide or a 1-piece FLGR. Since you can have your choice of replacement parts for $15 or so, why bother with the power tools?

George

ps - Great sig! Maybe you should break out the power tools!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: georgek on 2001-11-07 18:16 ]</font>
 

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My Colt XS has a FLGR and all I need to disassemble it is a penny or twig or lighter or stone or etc.

All ya gotta do is push down the plug far enough to rotate the bushing past it, what is the big deal?

Two piece may be a different story, but one piece is cake.
 

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So the standard full size Kimber would not need a tool with the FLGR but the Ultra carry with the bull barrel would?

I'm not worried about the pro's and con's of FLGR, I've searched and made up my mind about what I want.

I was just curious about the trigger.
Never understood why the bitching about the tool to take down a kimber, big deal, ive had 4 kimbers and loved each one of them!!!
 
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