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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a several guns with front slide serrations and may be slow here, but I still don't get it. I give my word I am not attempting to be a smart-ass here.

If you have time to do a chamber check then you have TIME. If you don't have time to do a chamber check then you don't have time. This idea of a tactical speed chamber check is confusing me. I thought we were not to wrap our hands around the front of the slide as part of our hands could go into the ejection port and foul the loading process, resulting in a gun not able to fire - which would be down right embarrasing in a gunfight. Also, I don't like the idea of my hand in the front area of a gun that is loaded, is there an advantage to checking readiness this way that I don't know about? So, with my ignorance stated I am standing by in my asbestos panties to hear the answers.

BTW - I have nothing against the serrations, and now they are pretty much standard fare for quality 1911's, but back when it was a custom option that cost over a hundred bucks - why were folks doing it?

This is just for fun, I ask that noone get to angry with the question.

Jake
 

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The way I was taught was to bring your off hand under the gun, grasp the forward serrations underhanded, and bring the slide back to visually check the chamber. It is easier to see into the chamber than if your hand is over the top and partially covering the ejection port. It may be slightly faster to re-engage two hand grip, but haven't timed anything.

Of course, there is the whole other discussion as to whether chamber checks are even necessary. Guns are (should be) always loaded.

Steve
 

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Personally, I think they are butt ugly and borderline-useless. If I suspect my gun is loaded I'm not gonna put my hand near the muzzle if I can avoid it. Guess it's just one of those peculiarities I've got. :grin:
 

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I don't think front cocking serrations are supposed to make checking the condition of your weapon faster, just easier and safer. I don't think there is a tactical speed chamber check to speak of. Front cocking serrations, to the best of my knowledge, are there so the conventional "pinch check" can be avoided, yet the operator can still accomplish a simple "press check".
 

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I haven't found the use for them, and I chamber check a pistol each and every time I pick one up. I know which of mine are actually loaded and which are not, but I still check the chamber. It's a habit I've developed and I think it's a good one. As far as the looks go, I can take them or leave them. If I was having a custom 1911 built, I would go without. A Hi Power with front serrations, now that REALLY bothers me...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A.J. I hear what you are saying, but you are posting in a manner that suggests that sticking you hand on the front of a loaded gun (on the front - not in front of) is inherently safer than retracting the slide from the rear serrations. Is there any reason why that way is better? No offense intended, I promise, but why is this "THE" way to do it? Of all the normally accepted doctrine I read about and practice I can see the sense to it, but not this.
Again, this is just for my education. I do know what the serrations are for, I just don't understand why it is a good idea on any level to use them.

Is it maybe because then the shooters hand is closer to the two handed firing grip and it is easy to get the gun back in action? I really don't know but want to.
Jake

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Jake Salyards on 2001-09-25 21:47 ]</font>
 

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Hate Them, some of them even tear up holster linings. And just NEVER got used to the idea of working the slide from the forward end.

_________________
Frank

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
-- Benjamin Franklin, 1759

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Frank Sottile on 2001-09-25 22:05 ]</font>
 

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Jake, I'm not saying it's absolutely safer only that it's safer than the "pinch check" (no finger in front of or directly under the barrel). I think the way you're most comfortable checking the condition of your weapon is "THE" way to do it. I was just throwing in my two cents about how I think front cocking serrations came to be and why they are still prevalent among many current 1911s.
 

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Most of the time they are pretty ugly, sometimes they are cut right so they look ok..definitely not the classic look..I could argue there usefulness on a carry gun..some like them, some don't..don't matter to me..they are usefull on a game gun with scope, where the mount covers the rear serrations...they became popular during this time perios of IPSC...other than that..who cares...don't like them, you buy a colt, springfield mil-spec or build yourself..like them..you buy a kimber or spingfield loaded.
 

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FWIW during the literally 1000s of guys I have ROed in USPSA or IDPA in addition to the hundreds of students I have taught I have yet seen a SINGLE person besides Ken Hackathorn....as an instructor..... use front cocking serrations in what I would consider a safe manner :eek:

If you have ever ran a kill house with me, you know that is saying a LOT :smile:

Personally, I can live without them, even though my current carry gun has them.
 

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i always thought they were for chamber checking when you had a full length guide rod. i do use them for chamber checking when i get to the line,just so i know for sure there is a round in the chamber. because i have started running a course and clicked an empty chamber. i have also racked the slide and the slide go over the top round because the mag did not go all the way in and snap in as it should. the chamber check helps ensure everthing is ready to go. i think now days though that front cocking serrations are more cosmetic than functional.
 

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By the time I really learned what a premium 1911 was all about, most of the higher-end guns seemed to have them, so I never gave the matter much thought. I understand their intended tactical purpose, though I've yet to actually use them in this manner; and while I usually fall into the "less is more" camp, I don't object to them when they are tastefully done.

That having been said, and despite my admitted ambivalence, I can accept the fact that somebody, somewhere must have thought they were a good idea. Of course, I've never used serrated/recurved trigger guards either, but these days I think it's just about illegal to manufacture a 9mm or .40 without them. :smile:

Chuck
 
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